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Sundries
...a sweatshop of moxie

Saturday, March 17, 2007

Seriously?




As mentioned in the blogpost below, this is the Publix Supermarket US Dollar Bill...which the till lady assured me was accepted everywhere as legal tender in the United States.

I haven't tried to purchase anything as yet, wondering what kind of face people will pull when I hand over this buck as payment...

...and though I do realise Americans are the most individualistic people on earth (witness the plethora of State licence plates, and you-can-make-your-own-postage-stamp sites, which would be UNTHINKABLE in other countries), but even so.

Sometimes this individualistic streak is a BIT much. Bunny Bucks??


BONUS SHOT: Something tells me that this blogpost might get linked to because of its Andrew Sullivan-like outlandishness, a la the Sperm Mobile.





So here is a shot of my purchasing the Bunny Bucks for $2.50 from the Publix cashier (plus that lemonade). Yes, worth one dollar if you spend it, but it costs $1.50 extra to buy the Bunny Buck.

For charity, I was told, if you believe that.

Labels:

14 Comments:

  • nice

    By Blogger ilove0088, at Sat Mar 17, 01:54:00 am GMT-4  

  • nice

    One can copy anything in China, but I bet you privatised money printing went out with the Manchu dynasty, huh?

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sat Mar 17, 02:06:00 am GMT-4  

  • If you'll wade deep through this lengthy excerpt from Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon (a dip worth taking, it's well put together prose, as is the entire novel), you'll see a description of the practice of private bank tendered paper money dated very precisely in the text as happening at, "Shanghai, 1645 hours, Friday, the 28th of November 1941".

    By Blogger XWL, at Sat Mar 17, 02:56:00 am GMT-4  

  • Seems this company also markets Santa Dollars as well.

    According to their FAQ, it's still legal tender since the image of Santa or a Bunny is a 'seal' that can be peeled off.

    I just hope too many others don't catch on to this.

    Imagine BUCK FUSH BUCKS!!! from Moveon.org.

    Not a pretty thought.

    By Blogger XWL, at Sat Mar 17, 03:18:00 am GMT-4  

  • According to the Bunny website, they also come one two-dollar notes. What's bad is that most people in the U.S. probably think $2 bills are fake and will call the cops to catch a "counterfeiter".

    I don't think cashier training covers two-dollar bills, fifty-cent pieces, Sacagawea dollars (hee hee), or Canadian currency.

    By Blogger Alcibiades, at Sat Mar 17, 03:35:00 am GMT-4  

  • Disney used to use the same printer as the US G'vnm'nt as far back as the '50's to make Disney Dollars which they used in Disneyland. One for one same demoninations

    By Blogger Ron, at Sat Mar 17, 04:08:00 am GMT-4  

  • This comment has been removed by the author.

    By Blogger Ron, at Sat Mar 17, 04:13:00 am GMT-4  

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disney_Dollar

    hmmm...the park told me they made the money almost around when Disneyland opened...

    By Blogger Ron, at Sat Mar 17, 04:15:00 am GMT-4  

  • In Canada Canadian Tire money is more valuable than real dollars.

    By Blogger Renato, at Sat Mar 17, 02:11:00 pm GMT-4  

  • If you'll wade deep through this lengthy excerpt from Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon (a dip worth taking, it's well put together prose, as is the entire novel), you'll see a description of the practice of private bank tendered paper money dated very precisely in the text as happening at, "Shanghai, 1645 hours, Friday, the 28th of November 1941".

    Very interestin'! I read until about the coolies and the sticks, and Bobby Steptoe (?) waving bills instead of newspapers, but I will finish it later for sure.

    You know, I have a fascination with China of the 1920s-1930s period -- and this is very redolent of that time.

    (I highly recommend The Painted Veil, especially over The White Countess, BTW)

    You know, XWL, in Italy in the 1970s, the government had a shortage of coins, so banks were forced to print their own currencies, which are collectible items today.

    They were just the coin equivalent of 50/100 lire, really very little money.

    But somehow, this practise is evocative of the lax Italian standards which are in turn charming, and exasperating to non-Italians.

    I never ever thought the US would follow suit!

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sat Mar 17, 11:54:00 pm GMT-4  

  • Seems this company also markets Santa Dollars as well.

    The link went back to my post! What's up with your links today, XWL? ;)

    Oh my God, though...Santa Dollars...

    According to their FAQ, it's still legal tender since the image of Santa or a Bunny is a 'seal' that can be peeled off.

    HMM! They did charge me for a seal, and though I don't have it to hand, I scratched the bunny logo in the front of the $ -- didn't come off.

    I just hope too many others don't catch on to this.

    Imagine BUCK FUSH BUCKS!!! from Moveon.org.

    Not a pretty thought.


    Yipes. Not a pretty thought at all.

    But if they do that, they know they'd lose a lot more credibility than what little they have now.

    Americans may love to express themselves with their t-shirts or bumperstickers...but money is thankfully sacrosanct in America.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sat Mar 17, 11:57:00 pm GMT-4  

  • According to the Bunny website, they also come one two-dollar notes. What's bad is that most people in the U.S. probably think $2 bills are fake and will call the cops to catch a "counterfeiter".

    Yes! Good point...just thinking for a second, but if they are false arrested, would this constitute false imprisonment?

    Would both police and retailer have a potential lawsuit on their hands?

    The mind. It boggles.

    I don't think cashier training covers two-dollar bills, fifty-cent pieces, Sacagawea dollars (hee hee), or Canadian currency.

    Sacagawhatta dollars??

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sat Mar 17, 11:59:00 pm GMT-4  

  • Disney used to use the same printer as the US G'vnm'nt as far back as the '50's to make Disney Dollars which they used in Disneyland. One for one same demoninations

    Disney Dollars?? That beats the Santa Dollars, brother.

    Seriously, this opens up a whole new idea about the US and seriousness in my mind.

    Especially since I watched with fascination, the precautions, and fail-safe procedures that goes into the US Mint's printing of US dollars (on the National Geographic channel).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disney_Dollar

    hmmm...the park told me they made the money almost around when Disneyland opened...


    What a mockery. Unthinkable in the UK.

    It's the little humourless German in me, which sometimes peeps out.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sun Mar 18, 12:02:00 am GMT-4  

  • In Canada Canadian Tire money is more valuable than real dollars.

    LOL!

    Let it be known for the record that Renato has sent me several denominations of Canadian Tire money. :)

    BTW, for those who don't know, Canadian Tire is like Sears Roebuck, Home Depot, and Discount Auto Parts all rolled into one.

    Whenever I watch Canadian TV, which I do since I have the Centre Ice NHL package, I am astounded by how ubiquitous Canadian Tire adverts are to the Canadian psyche.

    They are literally every fifth advert on the CBC!!

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sun Mar 18, 12:04:00 am GMT-4  

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