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Sundries
...a sweatshop of moxie

Thursday, November 24, 2005

Canadian versus American Thanksgiving

(Welcome ProudToBeCanadian.ca and Secondbreakfast readers!)

Visit TTLB's Blogosphere Thanksgiving-Themed Posts

A lot of people are unaware our cousins to the North, namely Canadians, also have a Thanksgiving Day.



That's right.

Canadian Thanksgiving takes place every year too, with turkey, with stuffing, with gravy and with family, same as American Thanksgiving.

(Wasn't too sure about the cranberry sauce, but we'll all find out later in the blogpiece. Suspense!)

But just before you start to send those gobbler e-cards to your Canadian friends, hold on a minute. There's a catch.

The catch is that Canadians celebrate their Thanksgiving on the second Monday of every October.

You heard me -- a full month before we do.

Well, if you think about it, it makes right bollocking sense, doesn't it.

Canadians hit winter going 120 km per hour (note the snide metric reference), much faster than the comparative balmy climes of Vermont, and tropical oasises like that, do.

They consequently have much less time to cull their harvests, which is the major impetus after all, for celebrating a feast of plenty.

Frankly, I'm glad they celebrate it a full month before us in Merka.

The quicker they get Thanksgiving, the faster they have to rush headlong into the next holiday -- Christmas.

With Canadians, there is no hypocritical pretense that we still have Halloween...and...Thanksgiving in November to get through, before traipsing into the Yuletide season, and getting into hock up to our orbitals.

No.

Let them put out their Christmas lights in mid-October, I say, and suffer a slow, torturous three months of Edie Gormé and Steve Lawrence singing "Christmas Kumbaya". Losers.

Of course, historian-manquée that I am, I had to go and look up the history of this curiously joint North American holiday.

That's when I immediately shouted in horror at the monitor screen, because the official ThanksgivingTraditions.com site made a huge historical boo-boo.

The first Canadian Thanksgiving was celebrated on April 15, 1872 in thanks for the recovery of the future King Edward VII from a serious illness. The next Thanksgiving didn't occur until 1879 when it was celebrated on a Thursday in November.

Yes, it is true. The then Prince of Wales had just recovered from a bout with typhoid in 1872, an illness which had taken the life of his father.

But surely, this is not the "first Canadian thanksgiving", because Royal Thanksgivings, or national thanksgivings, were nothing new to Britain and thereto, to its colonies.

Why, Royal Thanksgivings -- which take the shape of an official day of St. Paul's-attending celebration that some old royal bird had miraculously not kicked the bucket -- have been going on since the year dot!

For those who remember, King George III was portrayed having just such a celebratory feast, when HE had (momentarily, it turned out) come out of his dementia, in the well-named film, The Madness of King George.

Surely, Canadians celebrated a Thanksgiving Day then too? Even a little one? A quick Our Father and a wee bite of a drumstick?

Well, this royal chit-chat is all very well, but in no way does it represent the true, modern-day meaning of Thanksgiving, as you and I know it today.

In America, of course, this started as a sit-down dinner between viciously racist white genocidal settlers and the poor downtrodden, semi-enslaved indians, who were too famished to object to being called that.

It has long been a tradition in these lands to honour the friendly truce observed on that day, as indeed George Washington declared Thursday, 26 November 1789, a day "we may then all unite in rendering unto Him our sincere and humble thanks", thus prompting an immediate lawsuit from Michael Newdow.

But for whatever reason, Thanksgiving was not given its official imprimatur until our martyred President, Abraham Lincoln, declared every fourth Thursday in November, a National Day of Thanksgiving.

Emancipation Proclamation, winning the Civil War, and turkey-basting -- can you get a better legacy?

None of this, however, answers the lingering question of how exactly Canadians decided to up the Thanksgiving stakes by a full-month, and how it differs from the American version.

Here's the how. Hang unto your funny bones. It's a kick-save and a beaut.

Much like the United States, Canada seemed to have a difficult time deciding when a day of Thanksgiving should occur. From 1879 to 1898 it was celebrated on a Thursday in November; from 1899 to 1907 on a Thursday in October (except in 1901 and 1904 when it was celebrated on a Thursday in November); from 1908 to 1921 on a Monday in October; and between 1922 and 1930 the Armistice Day Act declared that Thanksgiving would be celebrated on Armistice Day, the Monday of November 11. In 1931 the Act was amended and the old practice of Parliament declaring a day of Thanksgiving each year was resumed.

On January 31, 1957 Parliament issued a proclamation to fix permanently the second Monday in October as "a day of general Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the bountiful harvest with which Canada has been blessed."

Dayyyum.

This makes the US-invasion of Venezuela look like a well-planned campaign (quagmire!).

Thank goodness there's the OSM/Pajamas Media debâcle around, else the Canadians would fight for the scatterbrained-wishbone by themselves.

But in researching the "how it differs part", I felt it emcumbent on this pajama-clad reporter, to seek the truth from the veritable horse's mouth.

Namely, my erstwhile Canadian guest-blogger, Renato.

"Hi Renato. Thanks for acceding to this demand, erm, interview on Canadian Thanksgiving practises."

"Hi Vicky. No problem. It's my pleasure."

"I'll be the judge of that."

"Hmm."

"So Renato, I've heard all about Canadian Thanksgiving from internet sites, but now I want a real Canuck to tell it how it is.

What makes your Thanksgiving different from the authentic, true Thanksgiving you guys so shamelessly ripped off from the world's greatest country, The United States of America?".

"Is this what they call MSM Bias?"

"Don't change the subject."

"Well, it's not really that different. We sit down with our families on Monday, usually around 6 o'clock, and eat turkey. It's exactly like American Thanksgiving."

"There has to be some difference."

"N---no. Really."

"What about the secret NHL handshake you give each other, starting grace by saying 'Holla back, Michael Moore!', just before putting on party hats with 'Ann Coulter Sucks' written on them?"

"You really should stop believing Little Green Footballs."

"Is it your oversized Welfare State that makes you so communistically controlling?"

"Yes."

"Next question: do you use cranberry sauce for purposes not tied to corrupt United Nations Oil-for-Food programmes?"

"I don't like cranberry."

"You're a smart one, arentcha."

"Yes."

"So in effect, you're telling me that Canadians celebrate their Thanksgiving in much the same way we do, down to the fixins and sudden family bust-ups?"

"You got it. Oh! Actually..."

"Aha! I knew it. Out with it, you mooseburger eater, you."

"The only difference I can think of, is that we don't have two NFL games to watch that day."

"How about hockey?"

"No hockey either."

"Wow, what a boring country. Thank God I left."

"Hmm."

"Well, thank you, Renato, for this totally ineffective interview with a card-carrying citizen of the ACLU Republic of Canuckistan."

"Go Leafs Go!"

"Losers."


So there you have it, ladies and gentlebodies. An interview with a real-live Canadian, who is too lazy to blog on his own, so he has to cleave himself unto the teat of Sundries.

But, in closing, just remember this.

Thanksgiving is a day of friendship, more than anything else. But its meaning is manifold.

It's not a day of religious import, though thanking God for your blessings, however little you may think them, is a good idea.

It's not a day to honour family, though surrounding yourself with family members you only see once a year, is a good idea.

It's not a day to be thankful you live in the country you do, though praising a land where liberty was fought by all to make it what it is today, is a good idea.

It's not even a day to just eat turkey, and stuff yourself with mashed potato and pumpkin pie, though remembering the good earth which feeds us all, is a good idea.

It's a day of Thanksgiving.

A simple day to pause, to remember, and to give thanks.

There may be more important days in your life than Thanksgiving, but surely, there are few days which give you more, than what you give it in return.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

MORE THANKSGIVING GOODNESS: Read Stuck on Stupid for more Thanksgiving linkbacks.

And maybe a Canadian can weigh in here, but it occured to me that Paul Martin does not issue a Premier pardon to spare the life of a turkey, like the US President traditionally grants every Thanksgiving. Fascists!

There's good news and bad news. The bad news is that you are going to Guantanamo

That's President Bush above pardoning either Marshmallow or Yam, one of the two gobblers who escaped the chop this year.

I betcha he knows how they feel.

Lastly, another salient difference between our nations' holiday, is that people up North don't have a Canadian Tire Thanksgiving Day Parade. Lucky sods.

36 Comments:

  • Gee, I like cranberry sauce. It's good with a few different things, y'know. Goes nicely with pork, not just turkey; and chicken, too. A dollop here and there. Yum!

    Happy Thanksgiving to you!

    By Anonymous benning, at Thu Nov 24, 07:53:00 am GMT-5  

  • Happy Thanksgiving Victoria! I loved this post and I was LOL during your "interview"!!!

    I am now off to my Annual Father/Son Turkey Bowl. Another great Thanksgiving tradition here in the greatest country in the world!

    By Blogger Jose Aguirre, at Thu Nov 24, 08:49:00 am GMT-5  

  • Good post! It makes me wonder how many Canadians celebrate an NHL Thanksgiving! (Cranberries served in little hockey pucks, Goalie masks used as strainers, meatloaf shaped like goalie pads perhaps?) Don Cherry Pie?
    Just a thought!

    Best Thanksgiving one-liner: I was at house with a large gathering, and most of were impatiently waiting for dinner while channel surfing. When a screen-filling nude breast appeared with the fully extended nipple for just a brief second some wag shouted, "Turkey's done!"

    It's now an old line, but then...

    Have an excellent bird carving Victoria!

    By Blogger Ron, at Thu Nov 24, 09:16:00 am GMT-5  

  • By Anonymous Anonymous, at Thu Nov 24, 11:15:00 am GMT-5  

  • Yeah, i'd like to just tell you, I'm Canadien, I hate Michael Moore, and love Ane Coulter.Although you may never be told, or see on t.v. there are lots of conservatives in Canada who don't agree with the left wing losers who run the place. I've never heard of this so called secret NHL handshake, but I do love thanksgiving, no matter when it is. You get to have a huge celebration with your faimly or friends, a day off work, without all the Christmas expenses. I found it ironic that you spelled honour with a "u" though, that's pretty Canadien eh! Happy Thanksgiving US neighbours.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at Thu Nov 24, 12:11:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Did I sign a release form? I think I was misquoted...where's the Sundries Ombudsman?!?

    Great post Vicky!!

    I will add that the first Thanksgiving in Canada was by Martin Frobischer in 1578 to give thanks for surviving the journey. Today we follow tradition and do the same after surviving an Air Canada flight.

    Of course we have Thanksgiving earlier. Have you ever tried defrosting a turkey in an igloo? Seriously, it's all the same except not as big a deal and it makes for a nice October holiday.

    Happy Thanksgiving to Vicky and all her readers!!!


    P.S. With the exception of Anne Coulter in her party hat. I hear she is having spotted dick this year. *g*

    By Blogger Renato, at Thu Nov 24, 12:39:00 pm GMT-5  

  • There's an ongoing Royal Commission on the pardoning of turkeys. It seems that they are having trouble filling the requirement that the turkey be able to gobble in both english and french.

    I will keep you posted.

    By Blogger Renato, at Thu Nov 24, 12:46:00 pm GMT-5  

  • This was a funny article. I was directed to it by the blog 'ProudToBeCanadian'. I am an american, my wife is canadian living with her parents while we wait for the slow wheels of gov't. to finally allow her in to The States. Anyhoo, the point is i've celebrated Thanksgiving with them the last two years, and it is so similar. And they do have CFL football to watch on Thanksgiving. In fact the Canadian Football League's Super Bowl is Sunday 27 Nov. Go Eskimos!

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at Thu Nov 24, 01:00:00 pm GMT-5  

  • "It seems that they are having trouble filling the requirement that the turkey be able to gobble in both english and french."

    Renato, you really need to post more. ;)

    By Blogger JSU, at Thu Nov 24, 02:15:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Gee, I like cranberry sauce. It's good with a few different things, y'know. Goes nicely with pork, not just turkey; and chicken, too. A dollop here and there. Yum!

    Wow, cranberry sauce with pork?? That'a a good one, Benning.

    Reminds me of the Cubans here, who put bacon on top of their turkeys. Gives it a special flavour. ;)

    Happy Thanksgiving to you!

    And to you, my pet! :)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Thu Nov 24, 02:34:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Happy Thanksgiving Victoria! I loved this post and I was LOL during your "interview"!!!

    Yay! I'm happy you enjoyed it, Jose.

    That might be one of my personal fave Sundries posts. ;)

    I am now off to my Annual Father/Son Turkey Bowl. Another great Thanksgiving tradition here in the greatest country in the world!

    Aww, you enjoy yourself with your dad (or son?!), and thank God for your family. It's the best gift we have right?

    Other than starting Mike Vick on the fantasy football today. ;)

    Besos, y abrazos, y que comas el pavo real enterito -- Happy Thanksgiving, Jose!

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Thu Nov 24, 02:36:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Good post! It makes me wonder how many Canadians celebrate an NHL Thanksgiving! (Cranberries served in little hockey pucks, Goalie masks used as strainers, meatloaf shaped like goalie pads perhaps?) Don Cherry Pie?
    Just a thought!


    Don Cherry Pie! Oh that's a classic, Ron. :)

    Best Thanksgiving one-liner: I was at house with a large gathering, and most of were impatiently waiting for dinner while channel surfing. When a screen-filling nude breast appeared with the fully extended nipple for just a brief second some wag shouted, "Turkey's done!"

    *LOL* I have to remember that for my next smoker. ;)

    It's now an old line, but then...

    Have an excellent bird carving Victoria!


    You too my dear Ron! Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.

    As for old lines, remember, I'm a ferruner. You can trot those old catchphrases with nary a groan from me. ;)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Thu Nov 24, 02:38:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Yeah, i'd like to just tell you, I'm Canadien, I hate Michael Moore, and love Ane Coulter.Although you may never be told, or see on t.v. there are lots of conservatives in Canada who don't agree with the left wing losers who run the place. I've never heard of this so called secret NHL handshake,

    *LOLOL*

    That's the best comeback yet.

    but I do love thanksgiving, no matter when it is. You get to have a huge celebration with your faimly or friends, a day off work, without all the Christmas expenses. I found it ironic that you spelled honour with a "u" though, that's pretty Canadien eh! Happy Thanksgiving US neighbours.

    Darling, I'm British. See, you don't have to be American, to be thankful to God America exists. :)

    Nor to eat turkey! Although turkey outside of Christmas, did get some getting used to.

    Thanks for the visit!

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Thu Nov 24, 02:41:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Did I sign a release form? I think I was misquoted...

    Suffer! Tell it to Fox News, bubba o' beers.

    where's the Sundries Ombudsman?!?

    We're a poor blog. I wear many hats -- this hat I'm wearing now says "Sundries Ombudsman: What's your problem, and make it snappy buster.".

    Very cosy.

    Great post Vicky!!

    Thanks Ren!

    I will add that the first Thanksgiving in Canada was by Martin Frobischer in 1578 to give thanks for surviving the journey. Today we follow tradition and do the same after surviving an Air Canada flight.

    *LOL*

    That's fantastic, Renato, thanks for the historical correction.

    And that's more like it. It gives Canadians the full right to call their Thanksgiving, as original and as memorable as the one with the Plymouth pilgrims. :)

    Of course we have Thanksgiving earlier. Have you ever tried defrosting a turkey in an igloo?

    I got one better! Have you tried keeping a bird from completely defrosting when you take it out of the supermarket to your car?

    Mind you, it's been a VERY chilly few days down here. Almost in the 40sF. You weep, I know.

    Seriously, it's all the same except not as big a deal and it makes for a nice October holiday.

    Happy Thanksgiving to Vicky and all her readers!!!


    Thanks, Renato!!

    P.S. With the exception of Anne Coulter in her party hat. I hear she is having spotted dick this year. *g*

    She'll have to fight me for the parson's glans.

    Eww. ;)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Thu Nov 24, 02:46:00 pm GMT-5  

  • This was a funny article.

    Why thanks. :)

    I was directed to it by the blog 'ProudToBeCanadian'.

    Joel is a great guy. And I say that as a totally unbiased advertiser.

    *g*

    I am an american, my wife is canadian living with her parents while we wait for the slow wheels of gov't. to finally allow her in to The States.

    It's taking a while these days, innit? I wish you every luck. We need nice Canadians like your American-loving wife. ;)

    Anyhoo, the point is i've celebrated Thanksgiving with them the last two years, and it is so similar. And they do have CFL football to watch on Thanksgiving. In fact the Canadian Football League's Super Bowl is Sunday 27 Nov. Go Eskimos

    Go ARGOS! Wait, or were they eliminated? Losers.

    Thanks for the visit! :)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Thu Nov 24, 02:49:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Renato, you really need to post more. ;)

    Yeah, get off my teat, Renato!

    Just kidding. ;)

    Renato is one of the most naturally funny people I have ever met, and not just of the tee-hee, thigh-slapping variety like I am, which relies on the obvious -- but the truly observant, intelligent variety.

    But then, I think that of all my posters. :)

    Happy Thanksgiving (again), JSU!

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Thu Nov 24, 02:52:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Hey, you guys --

    Do you know where our dear Paul has got up to?

    He's not been around for a while, and when I scoured my memorybanks for his blog, I noticed it's no longer in service. Nor his profile...and when I Googled, it said something about "dormancy".

    I love that guy. Paul, if you're reading this, wherever you are, Happy Thanksgiving! :)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Thu Nov 24, 02:55:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Drat!

    I forgot to buy the carrots. Dad is going to KILL me...

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Thu Nov 24, 02:56:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Just remember, Pilgrim Thanksgivings were singular events. They didn't occur every year. If the year was good, they held a Thanksgiving. If the year was bad, they had a day of fasting and repentence.

    Bear that in mind if any tries to sell you the line "we shouldn't celebrate Thanksgiving because of slaughtered Indians."

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at Thu Nov 24, 06:01:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Saw the references to Spotted Dick and decided to do a recipe search - it seemed interesting. Only problem: Where does one find Shredded Suet in the state of Florida? (I'd never heard of Suet being shreddable!)

    LOL

    I guess that's one delicacy I won't attempt. I'll have to stick with my favorite: M&Ms! :D

    By Anonymous benning, at Thu Nov 24, 07:37:00 pm GMT-5  

  • No one mentioned the year the U.S. had two Thanksgivings.

    By Blogger Walter E. Wallis, at Fri Nov 25, 07:53:00 am GMT-5  

  • Happy Thanksgiving, Victoria -- great post! (Another cranberry sauce fan, here.)

    By Blogger Cathy Young, at Fri Nov 25, 09:19:00 am GMT-5  

  • Hey, Victoria! Hope your holiday was a good one. I think mine wore me out--'cause I woke up in the middle of the night with a wicked cold. Weird.

    Anyway, about Paul--I noticed the same thing a few days ago. I had gone over to his blogspace on, oh, Nov. 19th or 20th and noticed a comment response he made to me that seemed to indicate he was feeling a little down. When I checked back later, the blog had disappeared.

    I'm not noticing a visitor from his area over at my blog, either (and it was pretty easy for me to tell what "visitor" he was, because since I had just started the blog and he was among the first few visitors, I could sort of tell people apart).

    I hope he's all right. Maybe he could e-mail one of us if he's still reading? Is it OK for me to speak for you, Victoria, in this narrow instance?

    By Blogger reader_iam, at Fri Nov 25, 12:27:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Just remember, Pilgrim Thanksgivings were singular events. They didn't occur every year. If the year was good, they held a Thanksgiving. If the year was bad, they had a day of fasting and repentence.

    Bear that in mind if any tries to sell you the line "we shouldn't celebrate Thanksgiving because of slaughtered Indians."


    You know, for a self-described religious person, I'm kinda glad that whilst Thanksgiving started, and continues to have a strong religious-influence, it's a secular holiday.

    And for those of youse (not you Anonymous, I mean in general) who don't like capitalism barging its "ugly" beak into the holidays -- you can't have failed to have noticed how little commercialised Thanksgiving is.

    Except if you're a grocer, obviously. ;)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Fri Nov 25, 02:14:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Saw the references to Spotted Dick and decided to do a recipe search - it seemed interesting. Only problem: Where does one find Shredded Suet in the state of Florida? (I'd never heard of Suet being shreddable!)

    Darling, I wouldn't know what suet looked like, if you shredded it in front of me!

    A cook -- I ain't. If I didn't cheat and copy my classmates' souffle recipe, I would've flunked Home Ec.

    LOL

    I guess that's one delicacy I won't attempt. I'll have to stick with my favorite: M&Ms! :D


    You know what really gets my pressure high as a kite?

    Rice pudding.

    Oh baby. Third helpings, and plenty of it!

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Fri Nov 25, 02:17:00 pm GMT-5  

  • No one mentioned the year the U.S. had two Thanksgivings.

    Here's your chance, Walter!

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Fri Nov 25, 02:18:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Happy Thanksgiving, Victoria -- great post!

    Thanks, Cathy! I hope you had a peaceful Thanksgiving too.

    Would you believe it -- because I refuse to take out a wisdom tooth, I spent an abysmal night of pain?

    I'm okay today, but man, I only had one helping of roast potatoes. Boo.

    (Another cranberry sauce fan, here.)

    I knew you were a sound woman. ;)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Fri Nov 25, 02:19:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Hey, Victoria! Hope your holiday was a good one. I think mine wore me out--'cause I woke up in the middle of the night with a wicked cold. Weird.

    Oh my Lord...my wisdom tooth travails must be spreading into generalised Sundries-readers malaise!

    Get better, sweetie. Lots of rest, and liquids (I prefer Canada Dry to water, as I like my nose tickled).

    Anyway, about Paul--I noticed the same thing a few days ago. I had gone over to his blogspace on, oh, Nov. 19th or 20th and noticed a comment response he made to me that seemed to indicate he was feeling a little down. When I checked back later, the blog had disappeared.

    Oh really? I feel bad...I didn't notice that.

    I'm not noticing a visitor from his area over at my blog, either (and it was pretty easy for me to tell what "visitor" he was, because since I had just started the blog and he was among the first few visitors, I could sort of tell people apart).

    Ah I see.

    I hope he's all right. Maybe he could e-mail one of us if he's still reading?

    I recently dumped my INBOX with all that good stuff, sight almost unseen.

    I do recall he sent me an email, that I MIGHT'VE KEPT, so here's hoping I find it.

    I surely will email him, if so.

    Is it OK for me to speak for you, Victoria, in this narrow instance?

    Oh sure, Reader_Iam. Don't worry. Your heart is definitely in the right place in this!

    I hope that guy is okay. God willing, he is or will be soon. :)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Fri Nov 25, 02:24:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Do you know where our dear Paul has got up to?

    Someone who misses me! I've been looking for that all my life!

    He's not been around for a while, and when I scoured my memorybanks for his blog, I noticed it's no longer in service. Nor his profile...and when I Googled, it said something about "dormancy".

    Apparently you were shown mercy for entering your father's home carrotless and are still with us, I stopped blogging after realizing I had little to say and what was left was being said so much better by others, so I became dormant, a natural state. I decided to visit a few blogs often, four actually, which interested me greatly; yours being number one, you can guess one of the other three and two you could not.
    There's been nothing said by me till I felt I had something useful to say.....well, that could go on for some time, couldn't it?

    I love that guy. Paul, if you're reading this, wherever you are, Happy Thanksgiving! :)

    What better thought to bring a man out of "dormancy" than that? I love you too, Victoria and I thank you for your very kind words which made Thanksgiving happy, indeed.
    I hope you enjoyed yours too. :)

    I do recall he sent me an email, that I MIGHT'VE KEPT, so here's hoping I find it.

    I surely will email him, if so.


    Might have?! Might have?!!
    Sigh.......

    Oh sure, Reader_Iam. Don't worry. Your heart is definitely in the right place in this!

    Reader_Iam, as soon as I figure what I've done to deserve such kindness, I'm doing more of it! Thank you.

    By Anonymous Paul, at Fri Nov 25, 10:33:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Someone who misses me! I've been looking for that all my life!

    PAUL!!! Welcome back. :)

    Apparently you were shown mercy for entering your father's home carrotless

    You should see the time when I forgot the fava beans.

    Not pretty.

    and are still with us, I stopped blogging after realizing I had little to say and what was left was being said so much better by others,

    Aww, honey, don't say that.

    You have plenty to say.

    Of course, I can't tell you how you should feel, or how you DO feel, but blogging is not a contest.

    I won't be JSU, Benning won't be Victoria, and Ron won't be Althouse (unless he wears those fake boobs again and hosts squirrels in his attic, but I digress).

    In short, we all have our voice. You just haven't found yours yet, maybe.

    so I became dormant, a natural state. I decided to visit a few blogs often, four actually, which interested me greatly; yours being number one,

    Wow, thanks, Paul. Knowing that, makes blogging so much more pleasurable for me. :)

    you can guess one of the other three and two you could not.
    There's been nothing said by me till I felt I had something useful to say.....well, that could go on for some time, couldn't it?


    Bah pish piffle.

    Well, I've already made my feelings known about that, so in your good time, my dear Paul, in your good time. :)

    What better thought to bring a man out of "dormancy" than that?

    A kiss?

    I love you too, Victoria and I thank you for your very kind words which made Thanksgiving happy, indeed. I hope you enjoyed yours too. :)

    I did! Thank you, Paul. :)

    It goes without saying that I hope you enjoyed yours too, but Americans seem to think it's par for the course (pun intended) after a while.

    Might have?! Might have?!!
    Sigh.......


    That's me all over. Sorry Paulie. :(

    Reader_Iam, as soon as I figure what I've done to deserve such kindness, I'm doing more of it! Thank you.

    You are well and truly liked, Paul. And you didn't even have to bring home the carrots because of it. :)

    Mwah!
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sat Nov 26, 04:06:00 pm GMT-5  

  • I must say, Victoria, I think you make pets of us all. As for myself, I will follow you anywhere. You are an extremely special person.

    By Blogger Paul, at Sat Nov 26, 11:21:00 pm GMT-5  

  • I must say, Victoria, I think you make pets of us all.

    Friends, Paul, friends. :)

    As for myself, I will follow you anywhere. You are an extremely special person.

    Oh babe. You make my day...bless your heart.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sun Nov 27, 01:19:00 am GMT-5  

  • that was an entertaining read!! thanks for sharing!! :)

    go

    By Blogger greg oakes, at Fri Nov 24, 10:40:00 am GMT-5  

  • The owner of this blog is British. Her future husband is Canadian, and her future children are Canadian.

    Do not show Canadians to be ANYTHING but positive people here who know the difference between self-deprecating humour and an obviously affectionate send-up of a beloved holiday.

    NEVER prove them to be racist or xenophobic by saying things like Americoons, because there's quite enough of that in the Blogosphere without tainting this blog.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at Wed Dec 12, 04:27:00 pm GMT-5  

  • You have absolutely no idea about Canadian Thanksgiving. Canadian Thanksgiving DOES include everything that American Thanksgiving includes....including football (CFL) and hockey (NHL). It is a time when families get together and enjoy the day. In fact, Canada has been celebrating Thanksgiving longer than the US has. Guess what? We also have Christmas and Easter! Such arrogance....but why wouldn't we be surprised? It's the US...and it's all about you, isnt' it?

    By Blogger Sharon, at Sun Oct 11, 12:28:00 pm GMT-4  

  • Lots of posts, so I'm not sure if this has been said or not yet. But when our Thanksgiving is done, we don't rush headlong into Christmas. We rush headlong into Halloween. On November 1, all the Halloween stuff comes down, and all the Christmas stuff goes up!

    By Blogger Paul Grant, at Mon Nov 23, 12:14:00 pm GMT-5  

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