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Sundries
...a sweatshop of moxie

Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Happened Again!

Generally fraternal twins look disimilarly, obviously, but when dealing with parents who are of different races, the results can be even more amazing. Now, when it happens TWICE, you know you have yourself a very unusual family indeed.

These little lovelies, twins themselves, are holding their baby brothers, also twins.



And here are the lucky parents!



It's amazing how much the darker girl looks like her father, whereas the moppet with the ginger hair came out looking like her own mother's clone...and yet, I can see BOTH parents in their faces, to a remarkable degree.

What a fascinating example of phenotypes at work.

Related

Remember this photo of two little twin girls, one black and one white? Their parents were themselves each the product of a white mother and black father.



In the article about them, it is said the chances of such children being born of one race each, is 1,000,000 to 1 (a rather convenient and not very believable sounding stat). Nevertheless, it is a very rare occurence indeed to have two sets born like that.

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9 Comments:

  • It's fascinating from a biological point of view, yes, of course.

    But what struck me most is the obvious love this family has for each other. In these cynical, stupid times, that matters more to me.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at Tue Feb 17, 12:55:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Anon wrote:

    But what struck me most is the obvious love this family has for each other. In these cynical, stupid times, that matters more to me.

    Maybe it's me, and I am reading too much into her expression, but I think the darker girl has an almost wistful look to her.

    Almost as if she feels she is the butt of a joke, or something. One doesn't get that impression (at least, I don't) from the ginger girl.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Tue Feb 17, 01:02:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Almost as if she feels she is the butt of a joke, or something.

    In the first photo, what I see is her saying, "Are we done yet? I want to go play."

    The situation is an excellent example of how the idea of "race" is a fallacy. (Ask any decent geneticist.) Which, IMO, really calls into question the entire basis of identity politics. Are these girls black? Are they white? Is one black and one white? If so, how can that be?

    To call these girls "black" or "white" is just as fallacious as calling Barry O our first Black President. (Everyone knows Bill Clinton was.)

    By Anonymous Starless, at Tue Feb 17, 01:25:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Funny, but my first impression was "What fun!"

    We have an adopted Ethioian son (Adult. Long story.) My father enjoyed telling people about his grandchildren....

    But one of my kids in particular refers to him regularly as her brother (he was an adult -- college age when we adopted him, she was in middle school). When that movie "Garden State" came out the adult biological kids all alerted each other with a "must see" -- as one part features the white protagonist identifying the black guy walking down the stairs at his parents' house as "oh that's my brother..." (Of course the fact that the mother did CPR on a hamster sealed the deal for them. That also is in my repertoire. This was part of son-in-law to be's introduction to our family.)

    Back to genetics though -- said Ethiopian son married an American black girl who has family members with Lumbee Indian blood. Lumbee Indians are a recently (I think) recognized group in eastern North Carolina, many with light skin and gray eyes.

    I have blue eyes. My husband is obviously homozygous brown. 4 kids, not one gray or blue eye in the bunch. Ethiopian son has two girls. Both he and his wife are brown eyed. One girl has brown eyes, one has the most beautiful truly gray blue eyes I have ever seen.

    Now *that* I said to them, is simply *not fair.* Not to mention weird.

    By Blogger JAL, at Tue Feb 17, 05:47:00 pm GMT-5  

  • I was at a bus stop at Clark AB with a Filipina, and her explaining to me that her children, which ranged from quite light to very dark, were all from the same father.

    I figured it was possible since she claimed a black grandfather, IIRC, and said her husband was white, but also figured that very few people would believe her. I just hoped that one of them was her husband.

    By Blogger Synova, at Tue Feb 17, 10:22:00 pm GMT-5  

  • vbspurs wrote: What a fascinating example of phenotypes at work.

    Indeed

    starless commented: The situation is an excellent example of how the idea of "race" is a fallacy.

    The idea of race amongst humans is no less fallacious* than breed or variety when talking animals or plants. We appear in different forms-that's a fact. But we're all the same species.
    I don't see anything wrong with prizing one type or the other, so long as the choice comes from below rather than from above--meaning, that it's OK to procreate with distinction, or not-it is the spice of life. It's only when rights are denied, or "representation" is enshrined artificially "from above" that we should worry.

    *gotta be careful spelling that word around WJ Clinton

    By Blogger chickenlittle, at Wed Feb 18, 01:29:00 am GMT-5  

  • A music teacher and his wife I knew (both of Scottish descent) had a son with single lidded eyes making him look Asian. It didn't help that he had very straight black hair.

    (I thought he was adopted the first time I saw a picture of him.)

    By Anonymous Alcibiades, at Wed Feb 18, 01:30:00 am GMT-5  

  • It's only when rights are denied, or "representation" is enshrined artificially "from above" that we should worry.

    Exactly. Identity politics ends up reinforcing precisely what it claims to fight against--that somehow a physical characteristic (extending into "gender identification") makes the whole of a person.

    Hey, I'm left-handed and I'm outraged and oppressed by all of the Handedism I see out there. I demand my pound of flesh!

    By Anonymous Starless, at Wed Feb 18, 09:00:00 am GMT-5  

  • The idea of race amongst humans is no less fallacious* than breed or variety when talking animals or plants.

    And another thing...

    I'm not suggesting that there is no distinction between people, rather that there are so many distinctions that when we draw the line in the sand at "race", that line is an artifice. People have preferences, they "discriminate", and that's not necessarily a bad thing.

    By Anonymous Starless, at Wed Feb 18, 09:19:00 am GMT-5  

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