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Sundries
...a sweatshop of moxie

Saturday, March 25, 2006

Rush Hour Turkish Coffee

"Coffee should be black as hell, strong as death, and sweet as love." - Turkish Proverb

There I was, in Ft. Lauderdale today, doing my usual errands of a Friday afternoon.

Now, that part of South Florida should never be negotiated on Fridays, let alone on the latter half of the afternoon -- traffic, which is usually at a standstill in Downtown, is completely logjammed at that hour.

You sit, wait, and wait. And wait some more.

There were two cop cars in either lane of me, and yet, they did nothing about what I call stop-light spill-overs:

You know, those people who decide they can squeeze their Escalade on a turn-signal, thus completely interrupting traffic flow all around them. Ain't that illegal? Or at least, rude?

In the UK, a street copper (note: no one under 101 calls them "Bobbies") would have directed traffic until the congestion had bettered, but you'll never get a South Floridian out from the a/c'ed car if you can help it, cop or no, so we all had to have patience.

That's when I saw the shop.

A Lebanese speciality grocers, although to be sure, I didn't know it was Lebanese just by looking at window.

It had Arabic script alongside the English, advertising their general Middle Eastern emporium.

But since we have a fairly good-sized community of Lebanese here, almost all of them Christian and from affluent backgrounds, chances were they were Lebanese too.

And they were.

The owner had a very strange expression when I came in.

You may think I flatter myself, and perhaps I do, but it was close to ecstatic.

Maybe he was just thinking, "Ooh, a new customer!", but woman-like, I had a gut-feeling, and that was that he was grateful, not just happy, I had come in.

Did some people shy away from associating themselves with anything Middle-Eastern or "Arab", these days?

(Although Syrians and Turks, amongst many others in the area, are of course, not Arabs, in part or at all)

I doubt it. South Floridians are fairly easy-going, and the majority of the time, let people do what they do.

Had I known the man better, I may have half-flirtatiously questioned him, but as it was, I didn't.

There were only men in the shop, who did look at me rather shall we say, guardedly, as he dropped all his previous conversations to attend to me.

I had just popped in on a whim, but suddenly, I remembered I had always wanted to have an cezve -- a Turkish coffee pot, which has many names in the region (ibrik, jezve, etc.).

So off I went, with the short Lebanese gentleman (about 2 inches smaller than I, and I'm not big), to learn all about "Turkish" style coffee.

He was happy to answer all my questions, and when I asked him how to make the coffee, he patiently explained it not once, but twice, and was almost going to take me to his kitchenette in the back, to teach me, when I realised the rush hour would get no better if I doddled.

I was careful not to cause offence, because a sudden desire to escape might be construed as more than just rudeness.

But he took it well, and after giving me a taste of his hummus and baba ghannouj (I bought half-a-pound of the hummus), I left with my Cafe Najjar and new coffee pot, in hand.

I have this funny reaction to coffee. Maybe it happens to you too.

It makes me sleepy.

In fact, all caffeine does.

So at 11 PM at night, I decided to make myself some Turkish-style coffee.

According to the shop owner, one should take the coffee pot, and measure the water carefully.

I would make two cups worth, so I put in two cups of water, then 8 cubes of sugar (I don't have loose sugar, so I just use "Dixie Crystals" or Domino Dot sugarcubes), and two teaspoons of cardamom coffee.

You have to let it come to the froth not once, but at least 3 times (!), using low flame to let it boil slowly.

This allows the coffee grinds to settle in a liquidy paste at bottom, which looks rather like Jed Clampett crude oil.

After it has frothed three times, you pour it with the long handle unto your demitasse cups, let it rest for a minute, and sip it.

Mama mia, what a taste.

I rolled it on my tongue a while, to get used to the taste, which is very unusual, even for my espresso-addicted tastebuds.

I had, of course, had Turkish coffee in my travels, but it's quite a different thing to actually do it yourself.

Then I drank it.



The cardamom gives it a very nutty taste, which is an acquired taste, but how I acquired it instantly.

I loved the frothiness, although truly the best coffee I have ever had is the mega-frothy capuccini in Rome.

Noticing my heart start to accelerate, I thought it best not to drink too much, since perhaps this inky gloopy coffee would have the more usual trick of making one too wired, rather than my usual somniforousness.

But I just had to swirl the coffee grinds in my cup, three times, like one does with tea, and try to divine my fortune.

Reading tea leaves, and coffee grounds are an ancient art, usually best practised in company, and whose lead was taken by women.

It's inevitable, since often our fate has not been our own to do as we wished, and this might have been a way of trying to figure out a life over which we had little control.

Or maybe we were just bored.

Here is my coffee cup.




Look at it above, again.

I Googled to see if we can read anything into this gooeyness, which apart from its suitably Turkish crescent shape, to me just looks murky and formless.

Before you click on the link here, think of the shape the grounds are making.

See anything?

My favourite is:

Fish: Life will become richer, happier and more attractive to you.

That is certainly a fortune I would wish to all who enjoyed this blog cup o' joe with me today.

Although this ain't bad either:

Dog: Good, reliable friends.

Who could ask for anything more?

P.S.: Stop the presses! I just double-checked the Cafe Najjar link I gave above, to show you how the bag looks like.

That's when I noticed this whopping pile of e-poo.

Cafe Najjar With Cardamon

Ingredients: Brazilian ground coffee.Vaccum packed.
Storage: Keep in cool and dry place.
Net weight: 200gx5.

Price: $750.00

Squeeze me? Baking powder? I paid all of U$3.99 for one vacuum-sealed coffee!



I'm not sure what currency these online Lebanese market peddlers are using, but I think I'm in the wrong business.

Never mind blogging. I'm opening up a bazaar!

28 Comments:

  • It's the closest thing to Cuban coffee! I went to that site and everything is $750.00!!! Versailles keeps looking better and better!

    By Blogger Jose Aguirre, at Sat Mar 25, 02:06:00 am GMT-5  

  • It's the closest thing to Cuban coffee!

    No. :)

    Although perhaps the real answer is, close.

    Los Turcos, of course, spread coffee all over Europe, via Venice and then through their little excursions to Vienna, when they left bags of beans at the gates after being repulsed.

    But I rather think that the Spaniards must've had coffee first, because your Cuban ancestors certainly make a very mean cup of java.

    Even so, this coffee didn't remind me of either Bustelo or Pilon. (Italian epresso coffees like Illy and Lavazza, do -- a lot).

    The cardamom ones taste like nothing I've tasted before, coffee-wise. :)

    I went to that site and everything is $750.00!!!

    Whoa! This has got to be some kind of Jamaican dollar site or something. That's unreal...

    Versailles keeps looking better and better!

    Be there, or be square!

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sat Mar 25, 02:23:00 am GMT-5  

  • My first girlfriend was Russian, and her aunt was married to an Armenian (not the best match usually, and in this case was no exception, they didn't stay together).

    That's just set up for the scene at her niece's 2nd Birthday Party.

    Her newly 2 year old niece was given a cup of full strength Turkish Coffee by one of her Armenian Aunties.

    I've never seen a child's (or really any person of any age) eyes as wide open as this tots were.

    Plus I could swear that she hummed, not through her vocal chords, but rather from the jittery firings of every fast twitch muscle and synapse that her young body could motivate.

    She survived (barely).

    And as an aside, why aren't you out being fabulous? It's near 3AM on a Friday in your neck of the woods, you shouldn't even be home yet, let alone blogging.

    By Blogger XWL, at Sat Mar 25, 02:59:00 am GMT-5  

  • After reading your lovely post, I ruminated...

    Io vollio espresso a Firenze! Adesso! Adesso!

    By Blogger SippicanCottage, at Sat Mar 25, 07:48:00 am GMT-5  

  • We have a lovely Turkish restaurant here, run by a woman who treats it like her home...The coffee is sublime...and the food is also excellent!

    By Blogger Ron, at Sat Mar 25, 09:02:00 am GMT-5  

  • My first girlfriend was Russian,

    Oh no! Another "my first girlfriend was Russian" guy.

    I have known a quite a lot in my life, and some of them are actually nice. ;)

    (Kidding, of course, but I do have a German acquaintance whose first and so far, only gf is Russian. She had him wrapped around her finger tighter than a Russian sailor on $1 vodka shots Wednesdays)

    and her aunt was married to an Armenian (not the best match usually,

    Turkish and Armenian might have been worse.................

    and in this case was no exception, they didn't stay together).

    Sad. Had they stayed together, you might've had more funny anecdotes to tell.

    What, is that what everyone wants from their relatives?

    That's just set up for the scene at her niece's 2nd Birthday Party.

    Oh oh.

    Kalashnikov's in the birthday cake.

    Her newly 2 year old niece was given a cup of full strength Turkish Coffee by one of her Armenian Aunties.

    Pfff.

    On the continent, they would've had her on the wine by then.

    I've never seen a child's (or really any person of any age) eyes as wide open as this tots were.

    Oh man, that was great.

    Plus I could swear that she hummed, not through her vocal chords, but rather from the jittery firings of every fast twitch muscle and synapse that her young body could motivate.

    My goodness, maybe not.

    Sounds like child cruelty -- like letting her watch an hour of Barney.

    She survived (barely).

    Poor mite...

    And as an aside, why aren't you out being fabulous? It's near 3AM on a Friday in your neck of the woods, you shouldn't even be home yet, let alone blogging.

    Squeeze me?? Ooh, right there. More.

    Seriously, though, XWL, this question from you, I didn't expect, to use my mother's Germanic syntax.

    You are a VERY intelligent and observant lad (witness the recent sleuthing of the butt-cheeks ironing jpeg), so I know you know the following:

    1) I have one, count 'em, one friend left!!

    I blogged about it, 'member?

    My chum is older than I -- he'll be 35 in April -- and more than that, is very sedate in his ways.

    And I'm sorry, but one just doesn't go out clubbing alone when female, unless you're on the game.

    Contrary to what you've heard, I'm not.

    2) I'm not the type to stay out night after night, or even just on Fridays-Saturdays, greeting dawn as she wakens.

    I had my glorious moment doing that from ages 20 to 21, coincidentally during my first year at Oxford.

    Little did I know that that University sets much store in letting the freshers socialise, and party the nights away.

    You have one big exam at the end of Hillary term, and that's it.

    So of course, I partied like it was 1999.

    I'm almost 31.

    I like my home, and I like my blog. Sue me!

    3) Dude, it was freaking cold last night!!

    Miami/Miami Beach was in the 40sF.

    That's artic for us, considering the night before we were in the 80s...

    So there!

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sat Mar 25, 12:12:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Or, ahem, Trinity.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sat Mar 25, 12:20:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Okay, this zucks.

    I typed my verification a dozen times, before it "took".

    Please let me know, guys, if you too are having verification troubles.

    Reader Iam notes in her blog that she's been having problem with blogspam, and so have I, the moment I turned off verifications.

    But if Blogger is buggy...I'll turn them off forever.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sat Mar 25, 12:22:00 pm GMT-5  

  • We have a lovely Turkish restaurant here, run by a woman who treats it like her home...

    No permit? ;)

    Not to blogjack your comment, but I say this half-teasingly.

    In Miami, a lot of immigrants have canteen type food delivery on the down-low.

    The Haitians are particularly famous for these types of "restaurants", and though I have never tasted their food (would you?), the houses look hardly hygienic.

    The coffee is sublime...and the food is also excellent!

    Mmmmmm, stop! I must have rack of lamb today!

    Or at least more Turkish coffee. :)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sat Mar 25, 12:24:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Verification went through.

    "Jugshuggj"

    LOL.

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sat Mar 25, 12:25:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Wow! I'm glad I scrolled up, since I had not seen your comment at first, Sippi.

    After reading your lovely post, I ruminated...

    That's when you chew slowly on a blade of grass, right?

    Io vollio espresso a Firenze! Adesso! Adesso!

    Si! Si! Ti voglio bene!

    Wait, that's not right.

    Or maybe it is. :)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sat Mar 25, 12:28:00 pm GMT-5  

  • While it's not Turkish, this is my mainline supplier for the Holy Bean:

    http://www.portorico.com/

    good stuff, plus the prices, especially on the weekly special!

    Plus, twice a year, nearly everything is that cheap!


    'fine-fueled Ron

    By Blogger Ron, at Sat Mar 25, 05:27:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Your coffee grounds look like the side view of a human embryo.

    Are you telling us something?

    By Blogger Ruth Anne Adams, at Sat Mar 25, 07:40:00 pm GMT-5  

  • I can't believe no one broke out the Turkish Proverb quoted at the top of the page Victoria linked about Turkish Coffee

    "Coffee should be black as hell, strong as death, and sweet as love."

    Also, Victoria, Your current dirth of female companionship slipped my mind, didn't mean to reopen old wounds.

    And I may have exaggerated slightly about the incident in question.

    (As far as I know, the little girl is now a healthy lass somewhere near 20 years old)

    I'm with you on not staying out to all hours, though there was a time when I was known to close more than one establishment in the same evening (bars close at 2, some coffee houses or clubs often close at 4)

    Plus I'm with you on finding anything below 50 too cold to think about going out if it can be avoided.

    (Unless it's to play football or basketball at night, then 50 is too warm)

    By Blogger XWL, at Sat Mar 25, 09:10:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Greetings VIctoria!

    I'm Cuban-Lebanese married to a Turk ... you can only imagine the diversity and richness in our cuisine ...

    It's funny that my Turkish friends find Cuban coffee (espresso)to be too strong ... I believe they are both very different in taste and texture ...

    After looking at your demitasse cup, I believe that maybe your coffee/water ratio was a bit off ... when you measure the water to pour into the cezve the 2 cup measurement should be equal to 2 demitasse cup measurements (Not regular measuring cups); then you add the 2 very full teaspoons of coffee plus the sugar ... the rest is the same ... unless you also consumed most of the grind, your cup should show a lot more coffee sediment for the "Fal" or reading ...

    But anyhow ... an almost clean cup is usually good ... :)
    Melek

    By Anonymous Melek, at Sat Mar 25, 09:26:00 pm GMT-5  

  • While it's not Turkish, this is my mainline supplier for the Holy Bean:

    http://www.portorico.com/


    LOL! Porto Rico. :)

    good stuff, plus the prices, especially on the weekly special!

    Plus, twice a year, nearly everything is that cheap!


    'fine-fueled Ron


    Thanks for the great link, Ron!

    There are few things I like more, than sales. :)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sun Mar 26, 04:35:00 am GMT-5  

  • Your coffee grounds look like the side view of a human embryo.

    I knew it! I knew someone would say this.

    I saw it too, BTW. Down to the cute little toes and fingers future babies have. :)

    Are you telling us something?

    If I am, I'm surprising even me.

    And it's the second Immaculate Conception. :)

    Cheers,
    Victoria (semi-immaculate.........)

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sun Mar 26, 04:36:00 am GMT-5  

  • I can't believe no one broke out the Turkish Proverb quoted at the top of the page Victoria linked about Turkish Coffee

    "Coffee should be black as hell, strong as death, and sweet as love."


    Sounds like a recipe for a good woman too, you'll admit, XWL. :)

    Also, Victoria, Your current dirth of female companionship slipped my mind, didn't mean to reopen old wounds.

    Oh no! Don't worry.

    I wrote everything I did without any recriminations, believe me!

    I do believe, however, that people should have some idea of where I am "coming from". :)

    And I may have exaggerated slightly about the incident in question.

    Noooooo. Say it ain't so.

    (As far as I know, the little girl is now a healthy lass somewhere near 20 years old)

    In that case, she's probably drinking coffee as we speak. ;)

    I'm with you on not staying out to all hours, though there was a time when I was known to close more than one establishment in the same evening (bars close at 2, some coffee houses or clubs often close at 4)

    Well in my case, I'm temperamentally more suited to salon type evenings.

    When I grow up, I want to have a salon like Madame Recamier did.

    Bloggins is a good substitute, don't you think? :)

    Plus I'm with you on finding anything below 50 too cold to think about going out if it can be avoided.

    Cali-fornian that you are, I would have expected no less. :)

    (Unless it's to play football or basketball at night, then 50 is too warm)

    Ooh, interesting. I can't say that I have seen many pickup games post-8 PM, so you got me there.

    I shall pay attention now!

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sun Mar 26, 04:42:00 am GMT-5  

  • Greetings VIctoria!

    Hello Melek! Bienvenido. Estas en tu blog. :)

    I'm Cuban-Lebanese married to a Turk ... you can only imagine the diversity and richness in our cuisine ...

    Ya tu sabes!

    What language do ya'll speak at home? :)

    It's funny that my Turkish friends find Cuban coffee (espresso)to be too strong ... I believe they are both very different in taste and texture ...

    I agree.

    I also used to think they were rather similar, but having tasted it at length yesterday and today, they are not at all similar.

    After looking at your demitasse cup, I believe that maybe your coffee/water ratio was a bit off ...

    I think you are right, given your explanation below.

    Thanks for that.

    Any coffee brand you recommend, other than Cafe Najjar? :)

    unless you also consumed most of the grind, your cup should show a lot more coffee sediment for the "Fal" or reading ...

    Ah, I see.

    I think I added more than 2 teaspoonfuls...more like tablespoonfuls!

    But anyhow ... an almost clean cup is usually good ... :)
    Melek


    Yeah. It was okay for a trial run.

    I will hope to improve, and one day, invite a Cuban-Lebanese acquaintance I know, to tell me if she approves. :)

    Thanks for your visit, and I'm glad I have anonymous comments, so that you could post it.

    Come back anytime!

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sun Mar 26, 04:47:00 am GMT-5  

  • Ooh, interesting. I can't say that I have seen many pickup games post-8 PM, so you got me there.

    It was while I was attending UC Riverside as a returning student living in the dorms (I was the oldest person in my resident hall, though a few grad students had me beat in other student housing).

    It's not far from the Mojave Desert and daytime temperatures in the 90s and 100s (but a dry heat) are commonplace from April through October (with variation, though usually temps stay high from Memorial Day to Labor Day).

    Needless to say, any exertion is done indoors or in a pool during the day, and if you wanted to play outside it was after temps dropped at night (which given the desert like conditions they usually did quite a bit, sometimes you'd push 90 in the day and threaten going down below 50 at night, but not often, normally there is a 30 degree difference between high and low temps year round)

    The well lit outdoor basketball courts were kept open until 12AM, the habit of playing at night sticks even during the winter months when temps can dip below freezing at night.

    Outside of a college campus you'd be hard pressed to find many parks that would keep their courts lit till 12AM

    (though there are some urban youth leagues that have midnight leagues as an outreach program for at-risk youth, those are usually indoors, and tightly controlled)

    I'd love to still be able to walk a quarter mile and find myself in a full court basketball game at 10pm, but that doesn't happen in the real world, only on college campuses.

    (Now what does all this have to do with Turkish Coffee, anyway?)

    By Blogger XWL, at Sun Mar 26, 05:43:00 am GMT-5  

  • The bottom of your cup looks like the old Proctor & Gamble logo which was dropped because pressuring Christian groups thought it was the trademark of the devil. Of course the 13 stars are missing.
    Personally, I envy the cup.

    By Blogger Paul, at Sun Mar 26, 01:46:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Victoria,

    In response to your couple of questions ...
    We speak English at home ... when we want to talk in front of our children; and we don't want them to know what we are talking about, we speak Turkish. Although our oldest daughter now knows enough Turkish to "decipher" the main points in our conversations ... and she's now learning French in H.S. which was our back-up language ... :)

    My husband gave up on Spanish a while back because he complains that Cubans speak to fast ... which we I must admit we do ... so it was hard for him to keep up with conversations ... but he still understands quite a bit of Spanish ...

    As to a coffee brand, the one we buy and you can usually find around Middle Eatern stores ... is called MEHMET EFENDI (KURUKAHVECI)
    Turk Kahvesi ... I keep it in the freezer to have it readily available ... I like this brand because it does not have a cardamon flavor ...

    Thank you for welcoming me to your blog ... I enjoy it very much ... I wish you well! Melek :))

    By Anonymous Melek, at Sun Mar 26, 04:00:00 pm GMT-5  

  • "semi-immaculate"

    So your 18-wheeler is squeaky clean?

    So the "Virgin Birth" [or should I say Virgin Berth?] ship has sailed too?

    By Blogger Ruth Anne Adams, at Sun Mar 26, 04:06:00 pm GMT-5  

  • t was while I was attending UC Riverside as a returning student living in the dorms (I was the oldest person in my resident hall, though a few grad students had me beat in other student housing).

    Ah I see. :)

    I'm also a bit older than your average Med School student.

    But my spirit is younger than most. :)

    It's not far from the Mojave Desert and daytime temperatures in the 90s and 100s (but a dry heat) are commonplace from April through October (with variation, though usually temps stay high from Memorial Day to Labor Day).

    Yes, it's very desert-like...but aren't there tarantulas in deserts? *gulp*

    Needless to say, any exertion is done indoors or in a pool during the day, and if you wanted to play outside it was after temps dropped at night (which given the desert like conditions they usually did quite a bit, sometimes you'd push 90 in the day and threaten going down below 50 at night, but not often, normally there is a 30 degree difference between high and low temps year round)

    Sounds ghastly! But perhaps you are used to it, as I am with hurricanes. :)

    The well lit outdoor basketball courts were kept open until 12AM, the habit of playing at night sticks even during the winter months when temps can dip below freezing at night.

    Basketball courts are open until around 2 AM here, IIRC, at the main campus -- but that's indoors as well as outdoors.

    Outside of a college campus you'd be hard pressed to find many parks that would keep their courts lit till 12AM

    Sure. Unless you're in NYC, or something.

    (though there are some urban youth leagues that have midnight leagues as an outreach program for at-risk youth, those are usually indoors, and tightly controlled)

    At-risk. What an awful name, these modern day monikers are.

    I'd love to still be able to walk a quarter mile and find myself in a full court basketball game at 10pm, but that doesn't happen in the real world, only on college campuses.

    I'm not much for basketball, XWL.

    How are you with tennis, racketball, squash or failing that, soccer? :)

    (Now what does all this have to do with Turkish Coffee, anyway?)

    More to the point:

    What does this have to do with Naked Twister?

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Tue Mar 28, 05:22:00 am GMT-5  

  • The bottom of your cup looks like the old Proctor & Gamble logo which was dropped because pressuring Christian groups thought it was the trademark of the devil. Of course the 13 stars are missing.

    I have never seen this...

    Personally, I envy the cup.

    You are anything but the dregs, Paul. ;)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Tue Mar 28, 05:23:00 am GMT-5  

  • In response to your couple of questions ...

    We speak English at home ... when we want to talk in front of our children; and we don't want them to know what we are talking about, we speak Turkish. Although our oldest daughter now knows enough Turkish to "decipher" the main points in our conversations ... and she's now learning French in H.S. which was our back-up language ... :)


    Well done. :)

    I like and respect your home language decisions, which I'll probably do with my own children as well.

    My husband gave up on Spanish a while back because he complains that Cubans speak to fast ... which we I must admit we do ... so it was hard for him to keep up with conversations ... but he still understands quite a bit of Spanish ...

    Tell him to watch Univision, or Telemundo's gossip shows, and he'll soon get the gist. :)

    As to a coffee brand, the one we buy and you can usually find around Middle Eatern stores ... is called MEHMET EFENDI (KURUKAHVECI)
    Turk Kahvesi ... I keep it in the freezer to have it readily available ... I like this brand because it does not have a cardamon flavor ...


    Heh. It is rather sharp, yes. I like it though, but I'll certainly look up the one you mention!

    Thank you for welcoming me to your blog ... I enjoy it very much ... I wish you well! Melek :))

    Thanks for being patient for a reply, Melek.

    Every once in a while, I take a day off, but always return the next! :)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Tue Mar 28, 05:26:00 am GMT-5  

  • So your 18-wheeler is squeaky clean?

    So the "Virgin Birth" [or should I say Virgin Berth?] ship has sailed too?


    Breaker, breaker. I can't copy that, good buddy. Say again on channel 9!

    Cheers,
    Victoria (Virgin only when I fly)

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Tue Mar 28, 05:27:00 am GMT-5  

  • How are you with tennis, racketball, squash or failing that, soccer? :)

    In order, I'm not bad, never tried, never tried, usually played goalie (which is to say, not particular good, and prefer my ball sports to involve hand-eye, not eye-foot coordination)

    As far as heroically nude twister (my favorite reference to 'heroically nude' that I came up through google would be this part of a description regarding the Arc de Triomphe, "The monument's iconographic program pitted heroically nude French youths against bearded Germanic warriors in chain mail"), I'll comment in that thread with my thoughts.

    By Blogger XWL, at Tue Mar 28, 04:03:00 pm GMT-5  

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