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Sundries
...a sweatshop of moxie

Wednesday, January 11, 2006

All You Wanted To Know About Judge Alito, But Were Waiting For Joe Biden To Finish His Question To Ask

One of the better roundups on the Alito grilling, comes from the Philly Inquirer's Daniel Rubin, in alphabetical form, reproduced here in its entirety.

It's very much a good cheatsheet for people who are not following the Confirmation Hearings of Judge Alito, all that closely.

A is for Samuel A. Alito Jr., from the Washington Post profile and resource guide.

B is for brevity. Sen. Russ Feingold, D-Wisc. went against the grain Monday afternoon, leaving three minutes on the table when he said all that he needed to. B is also for Sen. Joe Biden, D-Del. Biden's hair, in particular. And not just Biden's. "Dad, I've counted seven comb-overs," my son said.

C is for The Committee for Justice, which posts conservative talking points for those who favor the constitutionalist point of view.

D is for the Democratic Party whose own views and power will get a hearing, too.

E is for executive power. Robert Kutnter, editor of The American Prospect, in the Boston Globe: "Given the administration claims of an extra-legal presidency, what's most disturbing is the handy convergence of Alito's own conception of executive power and that of Bush."

F is for the "flaming liberal" that Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., said some readers could find evidence of in some of Alito's opinions. (Still looking for something to back that up. Anyone?)

G is for The Garden State. Alito is a fan of fellow Jersey guy Bruce Springsteen

H is for Harriet Miers, oh yeah, whose "blog" has not been updated for a while.

I is for the Libertarian blog An Inclination to Criticize, which voiced an opinion held by many sides: "I'm finding the Supreme Court appointment process about as tedious as the standard election year news cycle. Once people have stopped talking about it maybe someone will actually say something about it."

J is for the Judiciary Committee which holds the confirmation hearings. This article profiles its members.

K is for Teddy Kennedy, whose "I'm gravely concerned" statement gave a preview of the Democratic assault. Here's the text of the Massachusetts Democrat's remarks.

L is for liberals who take an editorial beating for their tactics from the Mobile (Ala.) Register. (thanks, How Appealing)

M is for Memo. As in Alitos's 1985 Roe v Wade memo.

N is for The New York Times editorial, in which the paper called for the Senate to delve into several areas where Alito's beliefs could be viewed as "extremist."

O is for Sandra Day O'Connor, the associate justice and swing voter whom Alito has been nominated to replace.

P is for Alito's alma mater, Princeton. His membership in the anti-coeducational Concerned Alumni of Princeton has sparked criticism.

Q is for the five questions that the Dallas Morning News would like to ask Alito.

R is for Red State's Day 1 round-up. Or for the elephant in the room - John G. Roberts Jr., whose confirmation-hearing performance is the new standard Alito will try to match.

S is for the ever-pleasing SCOTUS blog, which views times like these as the Super Bowl of its special interest.

T is for the full transcript of Monday's confirmation hearing.

U is for the Uncooperative Blogger, who gagged while watching the hearings. "I am sitting here listening to our elected cockroaches make speeches before asking one question and I just don’t get it....if I were on the committee I would have an aid in the background beep me when I was on deck to speak. I would walk in and say. 'I am sorry, but I have to deal with these people 24/7 and I am not going to sit here an listen to them bloviate.'"

V is for Vanguard, which has a mutual fund in which Alito owns shares. Democrats questioned why he ruled in a 2002 case that involved Alito, despite pledging in a 1990 confirmation hearing that he'd not participate in a Vanguard case. He ruled. He then recused himself. A new panel decided the case the way Alito saw it.

W is for Alito's "women problem," a tough column by Slate's William Saletan.

X is for Code Monkey X, the blogger who weighs the evidence and comes down against the nomination.

Y is for Yale Law, where the judge studied, and whose students and faculty have issued a report on his opinions.

Z is for Professor Z who says that with Alito joining Thomas, Scalia and Roberts on the bench, the "Court has become a powerhouse of conservative talent. The intellectual energy in the legal culture is now clearly on 'the right.' "

A commenter on Rubin's blog threw light on why Judge Alito was a Phillies fan, to those of us who didn't realise the regional demarcations in baseball fandom in the US.

"P is for Phillies as Alito is a DIEHARD Phillies fan. Remember, Alito is more South Jersey than North jersey."

Ahh. All is revealed.

NOON WEDNESDAY UPDATE: The more I hear the term, the more I think S should stand for Stare Decisus. In case you were like me, and didn't know what the Latin term stood for (it means "To let things stand"), or indeed spelt like (it sounds like starry de-sysus), here is a primer.

Basically put, stare decisus is the legal notion in common law that says prior cases must be recognised as precedents in future cases.

The Sundries lawyers here may have more to say on the matter.

And speaking of lawyers, check out the Stare Decisus blog, which tells the tale of a harried law school student. Aren't they all.

CORRECTION: Daniel himself kindly emailed to point out a hilarious, if insulting mistake I had made in my post -- he works not for the Enquirer but for the Inquirer.

One reports on alien abductions impregnating Princess Diana in the beyond. The other is part of the whole godawful MSM biz. Glad to clear that up!

8 Comments:

  • In North Jersey folks tend to have a Noo Yawk accent and root for the Mets or Yankees. In South Jersey the accent is more Philly, and you have to root for the Phillies.

    (Folks reared in Baltimore, Maryland have an accent that's almost identical to the Philly accent. Odd, huh?)

    Since I was reared in Bucks County, across the Delaware River from Trenton, I'm used to the phenomenon. LOL

    Nice list, and kinda funny. "U" is the best. Be nice to hear Alito say something like, "Sorry, Senator. I know how much you like to play to the Peanut Gallery, so I stopped listening to you twenty minutes ago. Was there a question in there for me?"

    By Anonymous benning, at Wed Jan 11, 08:00:00 am GMT-5  

  • I like when someone calls then "Flaming Liberals", it's even better when it's Sen. Specter.
    Good A thru Z list, thank you.
    I had my best laugh so far when Good Old Joe Biden put his Princeton ball cap on a bit ago. I'm sorry he took it off. He is soooo cool.

    By Blogger Paul, at Wed Jan 11, 02:39:00 pm GMT-5  

  • In North Jersey folks tend to have a Noo Yawk accent and root for the Mets or Yankees. In South Jersey the accent is more Philly, and you have to root for the Phillies.

    Hey! I think a lot of New Jersoyians might take exception to your first characterisation. ;)

    But as I see it, if you live in Hoboken, you don't have the right to rebuttal.

    (Folks reared in Baltimore, Maryland have an accent that's almost identical to the Philly accent. Odd, huh?)

    My dad lived in Bal'more for a while, before he married.

    He said they sounded odd. Southern meets New York.

    Since I was reared in Bucks County, across the Delaware River from Trenton, I'm used to the phenomenon. LOL

    Cool! How was that like?

    Nice list, and kinda funny. "U" is the best. Be nice to hear Alito say something like, "Sorry, Senator. I know how much you like to play to the Peanut Gallery, so I stopped listening to you twenty minutes ago. Was there a question in there for me?"

    I'm surprised he didn't even break a smile, or write down the thread of his argument.

    He did it cold, which speaks well of him.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Wed Jan 11, 03:25:00 pm GMT-5  

  • I like when someone calls then "Flaming Liberals",

    I had no idea Pennsylvania was so close to East London. ;)

    (Flaming is a common adjective, which takes the place of "bloody", still considered rude in some circles)

    it's even better when it's Sen. Specter.

    That was a classic. Glad to see he's better after his scary bout with cancer.

    And everyone mentions Joe Biden's combovers ("dad, I counted 7 combovers!"), but no one mentions that Arlen Specter's hair has grown back nicely.

    But then you can get more mileage out of combovers.

    Good A thru Z list, thank you.
    I had my best laugh so far when Good Old Joe Biden put his Princeton ball cap on a bit ago. I'm sorry he took it off. He is soooo cool.


    Darling, check my post above.

    I was sitting in my dad's leather massage chair, when I saw him pull it out.

    I said,

    "No, no way! Is he going to PUT THAT ON???? WHERE'S ME FLAMIN' CAMERA!!"

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Wed Jan 11, 03:29:00 pm GMT-5  

  • But then you can get more mileage out of combovers.

    I'd say I'd love to see people move away from making derogatory comments about people's hair but, like that's ever going to happen!

    "No, no way! Is he going to PUT THAT ON???? WHERE'S ME FLAMIN' CAMERA!!"

    I'm bloody well happy you caught him with his ball cap on! Great catch with the picture. How can we humiliate him more?

    By Blogger Paul, at Wed Jan 11, 03:52:00 pm GMT-5  

  • I'd say I'd love to see people move away from making derogatory comments about people's hair but, like that's ever going to happen!

    Ooooh. Did I touch a noive? ;)

    I'm bloody well happy you caught him with his ball cap on! Great catch with the picture. How can we humiliate him more?

    Oh no, Paul...

    Americans who use that particular word just sound silly and pretentious.

    Do as Arlen Specter does, and use flaming instead. ;)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Thu Jan 12, 12:18:00 pm GMT-5  

  • This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    By Blogger Paul, at Fri Jan 13, 09:20:00 am GMT-5  

  • Oh no, Paul...

    Americans who use that particular word just sound silly and pretentious.

    Do as Arlen Specter does, and use flaming instead. ;)

    Well, I saw you use flaming so I wanted to make you feel comfortable and (how do you know I'm not a dual citizen?), sort of like when I throw in an extra "u" in words like humor and favor.
    Can this Yank ever learn? It's bloody, oops! flaming not likely!

    See, it doesn't sound right before, "not likely." Sean Connery brought the phrase, "bloody not likely" to us and I, oh heck, for you, anything.

    By Blogger Paul, at Fri Jan 13, 09:22:00 am GMT-5  

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