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Sundries
...a sweatshop of moxie

Tuesday, January 10, 2006

Then And Now

You might wonder just how much South Florida has recovered from the Wilma damage, which left Broward County without power from October to almost the last days of November.

In visiting Ft. Lauderdale yesterday, I decided to take a snap to show you before, and after pictures, to see with your own eyes.



Wachovia Building then.



Wachovia Building now.

You can see with your own eyes, that the devastation is only visible if you notice the boarded up parts of the building, in what are obviously missing panes of glass.

And when the downtown of an area recovers, it brings back normality to that area, being so much intertwined in people's minds, with the hub of business and human activity of its most prominent section.



You might also remember, that there is a King Tutankhamen exhibit going on at the moment at the MoMa of Ft. Lauderdale.

Let me tell you, even in an off-day, this exhibit was packed.



Just look at the milling crowds outside and in the stairs, as the patrons come out.

I'm very much looking forward to reporting on that exhibit, at the next possible opportunity.

3 Comments:

  • Interesting, you'd think a big bank would be repaired by now, the rest of the area, going by that, must need a lot of work yet.
    Thanks you for the pictures, you probably can't take pictures inside the museum. Though if anyone can.....
    We'd love to see you standing by the King or his image. Rather shocking if you located the King. I know, no pictures. How about your mysterious shadow?

    By Blogger Paul, at Tue Jan 10, 08:05:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Interesting, you'd think a big bank would be repaired by now, the rest of the area, going by that, must need a lot of work yet.

    No, no. The opposite. The area is almost 100% repaired.

    Now, that doesn't mean that there are not vast swaths of Ft. Lauderdale still a ways to go, to be 100% too.

    But downtown is almost all back to normal.

    I was especially concerned for the King Tut exhibit, since they didn't have power until mid-November, and well, from having been a volunteer at a local Art Museum, I know it takes one or two months to set up the exhibits.

    Thanks you for the pictures, you probably can't take pictures inside the museum. Though if anyone can.....

    Well I'll try. I didn't have a camera last year this time, so I didn't test it with the Princess Diana exhibit at the same museum.

    We'd love to see you standing by the King or his image. Rather shocking if you located the King. I know, no pictures. How about your mysterious shadow?

    "No one knows what lies in the dark hearts of man, but The Shadow knows!"

    Ahh, old time radio.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Tue Jan 10, 08:41:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Back in the day, I went to school in Boston. Boston had been literally run into the ground by the municipal government; boarded up buildings, crime, cats sleeping with dogs, etc. Everything Boston touched turned to, well, more Boston.

    Boston had one skyscraper -- the file cabinet with a 'tude: the Prudential Building. I.M. Pei, who likes glass more than the next guy, got to design the second: the John Hancock Tower. It's two feathers and a pigeon fart taller than the Prudential, at around fifty or fifty five stories, so it got bragging rights in town, and got Boston snickered at by every other city.

    Anyway, he wins all kinds of plaudits for the design, and they build the thing. And then the windows start popping out of it. No one knows why. They shatter, one after another, dozens and dozens of them, and rain glass shards all over the nearby streets and passersby. Boston's windier than Chicago, and that stuff scattered everywhere. You were taking your life in your hands just going to the library.

    There was lots of handwringing, and lawsuits threatened; lots of half-measures tried, and it went on for a long time; and we got have the funniest visual non- sequitur in the history of architecture: The Plywood Skyscraper.

    It stayed that way, like a sort of architectural autumn -- the glass changing colors and falling on the ground -- until they got tired of fixing it and replaced them all with something better.

    When it was all done, and they were patting themselves on the back, someone informed them that the magnificent Romanesque church across the street designed by H.H. Richardson was sinking into the ground because of the weight of the Hancock.

    I love Boston.

    By Blogger SippicanCottage, at Tue Jan 10, 09:05:00 pm GMT-5  

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