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Sundries
...a sweatshop of moxie

Wednesday, April 04, 2007

Queen Beatrix Reacts!




...wouldn't it be cool, if she did?

Scroll down for elucidation.

P.S.: Okay, I concede the photo was amusing but its meaning might be a little lost historically.

It was an allusion to her fellow House of Oranje (Nassau, actually) cousin, one Grand Duchess Marie-Adelaide of Luxembourg, who ruled her tiny country by a quirk of royal history.

On the eve of the German advance into the area at the beginning of World War I, in 1914, this magnificent young woman who was to step down after the war, and join a nunnery, got into her car, and personally drove to her border with Germany, and swung her car to block the German Army's ultimate advance through Luxembourg into Belgium (an act which of course brought Great Britain into the war).

Perhaps melodramatic, and ultimately didn't help one whit, as the Germans merely laughed and nearly arrested her.

But what else is a sovereign for, if not to protect her people, if only with a gesture of solidarity?

Labels: ,

8 Comments:

  • "I declare this balcony open!"

    By Blogger benning, at Wed Apr 04, 11:58:00 am GMT-4  

  • "I declare this balcony open!"

    Heh.

    If she grew a moustache, she'd take over Saddam Hussein's duties.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Wed Apr 04, 01:12:00 pm GMT-4  

  • A little background on Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands:

    Eldest of four daughters born to Queen Juliana (a very nice lady, but almost a half-wit), and Prince Bernhardt (the original, Prince Philip, only he got caught with his hand in the cookie jar), Trix was a great student as a kid, but imperious and hyper-ambitious.

    She never hid her overweening desire to succeed her mother as Queen, sooner than later.

    In this she was always backed up by her dad, the German-born Bernhardt.

    To say that Queen Beatrix tilts left politically, is to put it mildly.

    She's possibly part of the problem, and not of the solution in the immigration matter...

    Her son's tilt isn't as easy to read. He just seems like a nice lad.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Wed Apr 04, 01:17:00 pm GMT-4  

  • This all reminds me of the Belgian Kings Albert I and his son Leopold III. Both fought in World War One, finally retreating out of the country. Albert returned to acclaim at war's end. By World War Two, Leopold was now King and had prepared the country for another German invasion. But he refused to leave after the Nazi victory, eventually being sent by the Gestapo to exile in Germany. His loyalty was questioned - he was later vindicated - and his return as King was put to the vote. He was voted back, but Socialists - surprise! - mostly voted against him.

    Sad, considering his real bravery, and that of his family. But by the end of WWII the Commies were feeling their oats all over Europe. Leopold was merely one of the countless victims of their lies.

    By Blogger benning, at Wed Apr 04, 01:33:00 pm GMT-4  

  • This all reminds me of the Belgian Kings Albert I and his son Leopold III.

    Good example!

    King Albert I was one of my fave kings of history!

    Both fought in World War One, finally retreating out of the country.

    In a sense yes. But remember that the future Leopold III was only 12 when WWI started. ;)

    Albert returned to acclaim at war's end.

    And his wife, Queen Elisabeth. Despite her Communist sympathies (a product of her eccentric and liberal Bavarian royal family), that lady was a staunch royalist, and knew her duty to her people always.

    When WWI broke out, she broke relations with her family in Germany, stating, "it's over between them and me. I'm Belgian".

    By World War Two, Leopold was now King and had prepared the country for another German invasion. But he refused to leave after the Nazi victory, eventually being sent by the Gestapo to exile in Germany. His loyalty was questioned - he was later vindicated - and his return as King was put to the vote. He was voted back, but Socialists - surprise! - mostly voted against him.

    Right, because it was judged that by his surrender, unlike Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands, he was complicit of collaboration.

    Sad, considering his real bravery, and that of his family. But by the end of WWII the Commies were feeling their oats all over Europe. Leopold was merely one of the countless victims of their lies.

    I completely agree about the end result as you wrote it.

    But I am not sympathetic to Leopold III at all.

    For one, he was very arrogant and imperious in his personal life, quite unlike his father, Albert I, who was an impeccable constitutional monarch.

    For two, he should never have surrendered to the Nazis. He really should've gone into exile, like Queen Wilhelmina.

    What is tolerable in one King (for example, the King of Denmark who stayed in Copenhagen), is culturally impossible in another. One's country's realities are just different, and he should've realised that.

    That's just my opinion, however.

    I agree that Leopold III was calumnied beyond belief. I'm glad he is being slowly rehabilitated, for other reasons.

    He truly was a very cultured man.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Wed Apr 04, 02:17:00 pm GMT-4  

  • Is that a white flag?

    By Blogger JSU, at Wed Apr 04, 04:16:00 pm GMT-4  

  • Is that a white flag?

    Holy crap, so it is!

    Great, so she's waving the surrender flag already...

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Thu Apr 05, 12:59:00 am GMT-4  

  • To VB Spurs
    Leopold III
    Unlike the Dutch, Danish and Norwegian monarchs, he stayed with his troops rather than joining the government-in-exile in London, and was taken to Germany when the Allies liberated Belgium
    When Hitler attacked in May 1940, Holland went down in four days, but Belgium fought bravely for two weeks, its artillery taking a deadly toll on the invaders. Prolonged resistance contributed to the successful evacuation at Dunkirk, where 340,000 French and British soldiers were rescued.British criticism that Leopold surrendered without prior warning is denied by the facts
    We submit that Hitler's decision to incarcerate the Walloon troops for the
    full 5 years and the Kings subsequent marriage to a Flemish commoner turned
    the other 43 % of the Belgian population against the King, not the Kings
    decision to not follow his government in London.
    As former soldiers, we understand the Kings loyalty to his troops.
    The Kings pledge of May 24 to remain no matter what occurs superseded his
    obligation to follow his ministers.
    The battle of the Lys May 24-27 stunned the Germans, they could not believe
    how much fight was left in the Belgian ranks.
    According to Liddell Hart, if it was not for the stubborn resistance showed
    by the Belgian army in the Battle of the Lys May 24-27 1940, the Dunkirk
    evacuation would not have been possible.
    Liddell Hart went further to say, " if King Leopold III had left Belgium on
    May 25th as his ministers and Churchill had urged him to do so. The Belgian
    army would have surrendered immediately, instead of fighting on until early
    morning of May 28th.

    IF SO, THE BRITISH WOULD HAVE HAD VERY LITTLE CHANCE OF ESCAPING
    ENCIRCLEMENT, SO THAT IT COULD VERY REASONABLY BE CLAIMED THAT THEY WERE
    SAVED BY KING LEOPOLD III, WHO THEN WAS VIOLENTLY ABUSED BY BRITON AND
    FRANCE "

    For us , we honor our troops and our King for their valor and their courage

    By Blogger LIII, at Sat Jul 26, 01:39:00 pm GMT-4  

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