.comment-link {margin-left:.6em;}

Sundries
...a sweatshop of moxie

Friday, January 27, 2006

Speaking of Homestead

Those of you around the US, who have been nonplussed by two surging prices:

- Petrol
- Tomatoes


Have at least, some good news coming to a supermarket near you.

Homestead, Florida, which is about 20 miles from Miami city centre, is virtually the hub of tomato-growing during the winter, for the WHOLE of the United States.

That's right:

The State of Florida supplies 100% of tomatoes consumed in this country, during wintertime.

And if you were like me, you've been completely blindsided by having to fork out upwards of $2.99 per lb for these blessed veggies (yes, they're fruits, I know, sheesh).

One pound of pommes d'amour equals to just 2 smallish tomatoes.

This is why when I heard on my local NPR radio that the late harvest of tomatoes, interrupted by the many hurricanes we had in 2005, was to be picked this past Monday, I was ecstatic.

I love me some tomatoes!

People thank Mexicans for many things, like tacos and what-not, but I thank them for discovering tomatoes ("tomatl" in their indigenous tongue of Nahuatl) and their exceedingly cute dogs.

It is only right and fitting that the majority of migrant workers who will be picking the tomatoes you'll be eating throughout February, are Mexican hands.

(But whoever thought to house them in a neighbourhood called "Naranja" -- orange --, had a very evil sense of humour)

There, now.

Aren't you happy about your soon-to-be-cheaper, red tomaters?

12 Comments:

  • I care only that they smash the little red devils into Heinz Ketchup (that's how Heinz spells it, me too), which I can, if I want, put on everything, which I did when I was small.

    By Blogger Paul, at Fri Jan 27, 08:51:00 am GMT-5  

  • Actually, imported Mexican tomatoes (once apparently part of a trade dispute) are quite good.

    By Blogger JSU, at Fri Jan 27, 11:39:00 am GMT-5  

  • I care only that they smash the little red devils into Heinz Ketchup (that's how Heinz spells it, me too), which I can, if I want, put on everything, which I did when I was small.

    We're a Hunts family. ;)

    BTW, when I came to the US for 11th grade, I was nonplussed by the Cuban usage of rice with every dish.

    So I just put ketchup on the rice, and it made it yummier...then.

    Now, I love rice, and can't stand it with ketchup.

    Growing older is a journey in self-exploration, I tells ya.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Fri Jan 27, 02:00:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Actually, imported Mexican tomatoes (once apparently part of a trade dispute) are quite good.

    Makes sense.

    And you know how much of a Captainess America I am, but I have to say -- American foodstuffs taste like nothing.

    Tomatoes, veggies, even chicken, milk have no taste.

    Maybe it's the FDA strictures, which are so careful, they strip away the dangerous (but oft-yummy) aspects of food.

    Or maybe it's the mass-production, although I have tried eating organic stuff, and it still has no taste.

    In Britain, you have milk, and it's a taste you will never forget. It's milky, thick, wonderful.

    Eggs in Italy, says Renato, have a red yolk to them, which make them succulent to the tongue.

    And in Germany, the vegetables knock your socks off, they're so great.

    What gives?

    Maybe it's the supermarkets, since not having fresh stuff around you, as one does around the world in outdoor markets, makes the difference.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Fri Jan 27, 02:05:00 pm GMT-5  

  • We're a Hunts family. ;)

    Goodbye, Victoria. Parting is such sweet sorrow.
    There goes the neighborhood.

    I hate Hunts! Always have.
    As a young man with four older brothers and three older sisters, being constantly harassed of course, my brothers washed out a Heinz bottle, filling it with Hunts as a test.
    It didn't work, I've hated them since. The line was crossed. It ranks right up there with selling your youngest brother into slavery and they would have too, to someone who only used Hunts, if they could have.

    By Blogger Paul, at Fri Jan 27, 03:03:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Goodbye, Victoria. Parting is such sweet sorrow.
    There goes the neighborhood.


    Wait, what! We're falling out because of tomato sauce???

    Dude, I proved my bona fides to you with the Steelers thing, even when people around this great land were sniggering up their sleeves about Ben Roethlisberger leading you to a Super Bowl.

    But _I_ believed!!

    Well, fine. Be that way.

    But I'll tell you one thing. Teresa Heinz is no Main Liner, hard-core Pennsylvanian, okay?

    Stick that in your ketchup and smoke it, buddy!!

    Anyway, I prefer brown sauce. ;)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sat Jan 28, 03:53:00 am GMT-5  

  • But I'll tell you one thing. Teresa Heinz is no Main Liner, hard-core Pennsylvanian, okay?

    She's not of This Earth, either.

    I'd drink gallons of Hunts just to deliver your paper, beautiful.

    By Blogger Paul, at Sat Jan 28, 10:29:00 am GMT-5  

  • "American foodstuffs taste like nothing."

    What are you talking about? Two words: Florida grapefruit.

    By Blogger JSU, at Sat Jan 28, 09:32:00 pm GMT-5  

  • She's not of This Earth, either.

    True. She's from Planet Arsehole.

    I'd drink gallons of Hunts just to deliver your paper, beautiful.

    Whoa. That's a paper I'd subscribe to!

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sun Jan 29, 06:16:00 am GMT-5  

  • What are you talking about? Two words: Florida grapefruit.

    Two more words: Florida oranges.

    Because you ain't lived, unless you've imbibed what passes for orange juice in Germany (ick).

    But I'm afraid I stand by my contention:

    American foodstuffs by and large, have no taste.

    When you have wheatfields the size of Romania, one isn't too picky about quality, you know?

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sun Jan 29, 06:18:00 am GMT-5  

  • A few years ago Wendy's was actually charging extra for tomatoes. I gladly ponied up for the juicy red stuff. As my grandmother says they're not called pomodori or pomo d'oro (knob of gold) for nothing. You can eat them raw, make salads, ketchup or sauces for pasta. The best ones are from my backyard. :)

    By Blogger Renato, at Mon Jan 30, 11:11:00 am GMT-5  

  • A few years ago Wendy's was actually charging extra for tomatoes.

    Not any more I hope??

    I gladly ponied up for the juicy red stuff.

    Ah, another satisfied sucker, I mean! customer.

    As my grandmother says they're not called pomodori or pomo d'oro (knob of gold) for nothing.

    So true.

    Which reminds me that when tomatoes made their appearance in Europe in the 1700's, a rumour spread that tomatoes were poisonous.

    One man took this rumour badly, and decided to eat a tomato in the middle of a London street, to make the point that tomatoes are great, and certainly not poisonous.

    It is said when he bit into the ripe, juicy tomato, people around him screamed.

    You can eat them raw, make salads, ketchup or sauces for pasta. The best ones are from my backyard. :)

    Showoff!

    ...what I wouldn't give to have a garden again. Oh well, maybe I'll get a pot.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Mon Jan 30, 07:41:00 pm GMT-5  

Post a Comment

Who linked Here:

Create a Link

<< Home


 




Advertise on blogs
British Expat Blog Directory.