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Sundries
...a sweatshop of moxie

Tuesday, January 23, 2007

My American Accent

What American accent do you have?
Your Result: The Northeast
 

Judging by how you talk you are probably from north Jersey, New York City, Connecticut or Rhode Island. Chances are, if you are from New York City (and not those other places) people would probably be able to tell if they actually heard you speak.

Boston
 
Philadelphia
 
The Midland
 
The Inland North
 
The West
 
The South
 
North Central
 
What American accent do you have?
Quiz Created on GoToQuiz


I'm closest to the Boston accent? I presume more Beacon Hill, than Southie.

Makes utter sense, actually.

When I went there to visit an ex-boyfriend who attended Boston College at the time, I was chatting to a British guy with the odd name of "Chip" in his dormitory. Turned out he was Senator Saltonstall's great-grandson.

You could've knocked me down with a feather.

Still, I do a mean Southern accent, and not for nothing, is the greatest incarnation of Southern gentlewomanhood an Englishwoman -- Vivien Leigh.

But it seems I'm more pahk the cah in Hahvahd yahd than Fiddle-dee-dee.

I can live with that.

18 Comments:

  • Inland North

    Wow, they got me pegged

    By Anonymous BrotherDarryl, at Mon Jan 22, 11:45:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Inland North

    Wow, they got me pegged

    By Anonymous BrotherDarryl, at Mon Jan 22, 11:46:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Inland North

    Whoa! Wisconsin it is. I wonder...what are the keys to this or the other.

    I know that "pen"/"pin" is a Southernism, like pronouncing President Kinnidy.

    Nice to see you around, Darryl. :)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Tue Jan 23, 01:14:00 am GMT-5  

  • In another post you told us about Stewies "fake" British Accent and that got me to wondering. What do you think of the accent of the GEICO Gecko? Is it real?

    By Anonymous BrotherDarryl, at Tue Jan 23, 02:29:00 am GMT-5  

  • Nice to see you around, Darryl. :)

    My dear, I have no doubt that as long as you keep writing you'll inspire me to stick around.

    By Anonymous BrotherDarryl, at Tue Jan 23, 02:32:00 am GMT-5  

  • In another post you told us about Stewies "fake" British Accent and that got me to wondering. What do you think of the accent of the GEICO Gecko? Is it real?

    Well, can't say as I have thought much about this :), but I think it's fakey-wakey.

    BTW, is it me, or was the Gecko voiced by a much-posher voice, in earlier years?

    Apparently, the shift from RP to Estuary English is not only complete at the BBC, but with corporate lizard mascots, too.

    My dear, I have no doubt that as long as you keep writing you'll inspire me to stick around.

    Aww! Smooch.

    And hosting the Yahoo NFL PLUS doesn't hurt either too. ;)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Tue Jan 23, 03:29:00 am GMT-5  

  • Inland North as well! When I doubt I blame Canada. That never fails!

    By Blogger Ron, at Tue Jan 23, 10:15:00 am GMT-5  

  • That's it, we're so over, Vic. I can't be seen with a...a...a...damned yankee.

    Me? Midlands, which I already knew. Which is not to say that the occasional y'all, fixin', awl (oil), or coke (generic dark carbonated beverage) doesn't escape my lips.

    By Blogger I R A Darth Aggie, at Tue Jan 23, 10:26:00 am GMT-5  

  • Do you have an overwhelming desire for Sir Laurence?

    Are you ashamed at how large your hands are that you make a point to hide them when you act?

    Are you just the cutest little thing in shoe leather who, bedecked in green velvet [I saw it in the window and had to have it], look like a fresh Georgia peach? Did you name your new mercantile, at Rhett's urging, "The Caveat Emptorium" because you wanted something with "emporium" in it?

    By Blogger Ruth Anne Adams, at Tue Jan 23, 03:34:00 pm GMT-5  

  • West. Lowest common denominator.
    Basically I have no discernible accent according to the test. Not surprising since Florida, with the exception of the rural areas, is a mix of people from all parts of the country and the accent tends to be influenced more by TV and the Standard American accent.

    By Blogger Robert, at Tue Jan 23, 07:31:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Not surprising since Florida, with the exception of the rural areas, is a mix of people from all parts of the country and the accent tends to be influenced more by TV and the Standard American accent.

    The general consensus in the South is that Florida is not really a "Southern" state since there are more Yankees than Southerners there.

    By Anonymous BrotherDarryl, at Tue Jan 23, 11:54:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Inland North as well! When I doubt I blame Canada. That never fails!

    Don't TELL me you say aboot??

    BTW, Renato doesn't. He'll hate me for saying this, but he sounds like any ole American.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Wed Jan 24, 02:20:00 am GMT-5  

  • That's it, we're so over, Vic. I can't be seen with a...a...a...damned yankee.

    Babe, they don't call it NEW ENGLAND for nuttin'. :)

    Me? Midlands, which I already knew. Which is not to say that the occasional y'all, fixin', awl (oil), or coke (generic dark carbonated beverage) doesn't escape my lips.

    Awl? Ooh. That friend I mentioned in the post above -- her parents say 'erl' for oil. Yep, they're from NYC.

    And I too love saying 'ya'll'. It's so cosy.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Wed Jan 24, 02:21:00 am GMT-5  

  • Did you name your new mercantile, at Rhett's urging, "The Caveat Emptorium" because you wanted something with "emporium" in it?

    The funny thing about this, Ruth Anne, is that I do a mean Prissy accent.

    "Lawdy Miss Scarlitt, I don't know how to birth no babies".

    I would Audioblogger so you could hear it, but the service was discontinued, I found out last night. ;(

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Wed Jan 24, 02:22:00 am GMT-5  

  • West. Lowest common denominator.
    Basically I have no discernible accent according to the test. Not surprising since Florida, with the exception of the rural areas, is a mix of people from all parts of the country and the accent tends to be influenced more by TV and the Standard American accent.


    Good point, Robertico.

    I have to say that most kids down here have what I call The Miami Accent.

    "Anglos", Cubans, blacks -- they all have that vaguely Hispanic intonation, vaguely Southern rhythms, vaguely Valley Girl patois accent.

    It's very disconcerting, and I'm glad you just have a Western one. ;)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Wed Jan 24, 02:24:00 am GMT-5  

  • I rated Phliadelphia, which is good since I was reared 45 minutes north of the old city.

    It's funny how many people equate a Philly accent with a New York accent. They aren't anything alike. The number of films and TV shows I've seen, with supposedly Philly natives, speaking like someone from the Bronx or Brooklyn, peeves me no end!

    "Hey! Way yoo frum?"
    "Down neah sowt Philly."
    "Yeah? Me too!" ~ Pure New Yawk, but the Hollywooders haven't a clue. If the word water is pronounced 'watuh' you aren't hearing a Philly lad. In Philly it's 'wooder'. I know because my mother was reared in Philly and she still says it just like that.

    By Blogger benning, at Thu Jan 25, 08:14:00 am GMT-5  

  • North Central for me, but that was oh-so-predictable. (And no, that doesn't mean I talk like Jerry Lundegaard, though there are still people around here who do.)

    Re: GEICO gecko

    "Anglos", Cubans, blacks -- they all have that vaguely Hispanic intonation, vaguely Southern rhythms, vaguely Valley Girl patois accent.

    It's very disconcerting, and I'm glad you just have a Western one. ;)


    Even more disconcerting was a stand-up comedian who was Korean yet raised in Texas, so he had a very thick Texan drawl. The face just didn't match the voice. More proof that environment determines dialect.

    By Blogger Ploorian, at Thu Jan 25, 06:21:00 pm GMT-5  

  • I'm not sure if this is true, but didn't the British change the way they pronounce English words sometime in the 18th Century.

    There was an (American) English professor who apparently gave a lecture on how the differences evolved. Apparently, the British wanted to sound more like the French, so they adopted softer sounds. "Aunt", pronounced "ant" in American English, is softer in British English. Other changes also occurred such as "lever" to "lee-ver".

    Since British sailors would communicate with American ports, some of these language changes migrated to these cities/regions. In particular, Boston, New York, Charleston, and New Orleans were affected (though, New Orleans was also affected by French and Spanish traders).

    So, anyway, whenever you hear a Bostonian say "Cuber" instead of "Cuba", it's the fault of the British.

    By Blogger Alcibiades, at Fri Jan 26, 10:24:00 pm GMT-5  

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