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Sundries
...a sweatshop of moxie

Monday, February 12, 2007

Fix Or Repair Daily --or-- Found On Road Dead

Not this Ford, baby!





(Click on the link, to see a larger picture)

This was posted by Internet Ronin in my honour, as I had expressed interest in his late father's hobby, of vintage Ford Model A trucks.

Can you guess how old this roadster is? The answer in the link above, will astonish you. My car NOW doesn't look this good.

And since we're on the topic, has anyone on Sundries been to Henry Ford's Americana museum, in Michigan?

The museum's transport collection must be AMAZING, don't you think?

Check out the Rosa Parks Bus, wow.



Although, this I don't get:

The Ford Rouge Factory Tour

Rouge?

Presumably, as in Red State, not as in Red Flag. We all know about Henry Ford, don't we.

UPDATE: Internet Ronin has two AMAZING photos, of other vintage vehicles.

One is a dazzlingly yellow vintage school bus, the kind that Shirley Jones probably used before she became Mrs. Partridge.

The second prompted Ruth Anne Adams to remark:

Oh, my gosh! That looks just like Mater! My kids would freak out to see it in person.

It looks EXACTLY like Mater, aka Larry the Cable Guy.

Labels: , ,

15 Comments:

  • Thanks for the link, dear one! If anyone wants a closer (larger) view of the truck, once at my blog click on the photo itself.

    When I have the chance, I'll upload a shot of my 1931 AA tow truck, which I believe will be more in keeping with what most people expect to see when thinking about a vehicle that old. (We discovered it sitting under an oak tree in a field, where it had sat for 25 years.)

    Speaking of buses, I'll hunt around for a picture of our club's restored 1930 Model A school bus. A lot of people put thousands of hours into restoring it.

    While I've not yet made it to Greenfield, it is an amazing place, by all accounts. I will get there one day, I'm sure.

    BTW, I'm glad I'm not the only one who thought the name for the Rouge plant was funny.

    By Blogger Internet Ronin, at Mon Feb 12, 02:54:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Thanks for the link, dear one! If anyone wants a closer (larger) view of the truck, once at my blog click on the photo itself.

    Shush! I'm trying to drive traffic to your blog, no pun intended. ;)

    When I have the chance, I'll upload a shot of my 1931 AA tow truck, which I believe will be more in keeping with what most people expect to see when thinking about a vehicle that old. (We discovered it sitting under an oak tree in a field, where it had sat for 25 years.)

    You know what this reminds me of? Have you ever watched MTV's Pimp My Ride?

    I LOVE that show. All the scuzzbuckets and rust-roadsters exit looking spiffy and maxxed out with the latest gadgets.

    I've fantasised what they would do to a car of mine, which is currently lying fallow in our garage.

    Why not apply to that programme, IR, or do you want to refurbish it, yourself? ;)

    Speaking of buses, I'll hunt around for a picture of our club's restored 1930 Model A school bus. A lot of people put thousands of hours into restoring it.

    Wow. Do you have a club or group around you, about Model A's?

    A good friend of mine is from Missouri, and her dad doesn't countenance Ford anything.

    He's a Chevy man, and I've been told he gets angry when told they're rubbish (usually a Ford man).

    While I've not yet made it to Greenfield, it is an amazing place, by all accounts. I will get there one day, I'm sure.

    I have been to Michigan, IN MY CAR all the way from Florida, which is unfathomable to a British girl in terms of miles, but I did it.

    But when I arrived in Detroit...well, I left real quick to my next destination in Lansing.

    Scary dangerous.

    It's like Overtown and Liberty City, only huger.

    BTW, I'm glad I'm not the only one who thought the name for the Rouge plant was funny.

    Heh. :)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Mon Feb 12, 03:06:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Greenfield Village and the Henry Ford Museum are quite entertaining! There is always something going on, so it has the rhythm of a 19th century small town! There is a two year wait to get married in the small chapel there...But the Old Car Festival in September, that's amazing...

    Since Detroit was founded in 1701 by Cadillac, it's not odd that many things have French names...Detroit's street layout started like Paris -- than the English took over and tried to make it a grid! The worst of both is what you get... I used to have a t-shirt that said, "Detroit -- where the weak will be killed and eaten." S'no joke! It still has some cool spots though. But it's Ann Arbor where I live. :)

    If you get a chance, check out the car show "Overhaulin'" on TLC. Amazing rebuilds!

    By Blogger Ron, at Mon Feb 12, 03:44:00 pm GMT-5  

  • I clicked on the link you provided and learned the following about the reason it is named Rouge:

    By the Numbers
    Located a few miles south of Detroit at the confluence of the Rouge and Detroit Rivers, the original Rouge complex was a mile-and-a-half wide and more than a mile long. The multiplex of 93 buildings totaled 15,767,708 square feet of floor area crisscrossed by 120 miles of conveyors.

    By Blogger Jose Aguirre, at Mon Feb 12, 03:59:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Pssst! Huff & Puff Not-so-Rapid Transit #1 and the Happy Hooker are now on display on the blog.

    By Blogger Internet Ronin, at Mon Feb 12, 05:11:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Hi Victoria-
    I copied a shaker work table from Henry Ford's museum. I call it a Ma Barker's kitchen table. I made up the part about Ma Barker. It's just called a shaker work table at the museum.

    I've never been there. I go a picture of the thing from a very old out of print book.

    By Blogger SippicanCottage, at Mon Feb 12, 10:50:00 pm GMT-5  

  • Also, don't forget FIAT:

    Futile Italian Attempt at Transportation.

    or Fix It Again, Tony!


    The Henry Ford Museum also has the chair from Ford's Theatre that Lincoln was shot in by John Wilkes Booth. Is there blood? Oh, yeah.

    By Blogger Ron, at Tue Feb 13, 12:05:00 am GMT-5  

  • Greenfield Village and the Henry Ford Museum are quite entertaining!

    Is it a living museum like Williamsburg?

    There is always something going on, so it has the rhythm of a 19th century small town! There is a two year wait to get married in the small chapel there...But the Old Car Festival in September, that's amazing...

    Wow...two years to get married in a museum. Somehow this is very American. :)

    Since Detroit was founded in 1701 by Cadillac, it's not odd that many things have French names...Detroit's street layout started like Paris -- than the English took over and tried to make it a grid! The worst of both is what you get... I used to have a t-shirt that said, "Detroit -- where the weak will be killed and eaten." S'no joke! It still has some cool spots though. But it's Ann Arbor where I live. :)

    Was Detroit ever pronounced Deh-trwah, when it was French?

    If you get a chance, check out the car show "Overhaulin'" on TLC. Amazing rebuilds!

    Oh! I think I've caught sight of that, but never a full episode.

    Pimp my Ride is just about the only thing I watch on MTV these days. I remember the fun days of MTV, in my youth.

    My parents' door neighbour had a little girl, who had cable TV in her home back in 1983 or so, which was very exciting.

    The cable provider was called On-TV, and I wonder if the Miamians here remember that?

    MTV was the first channel of choice, whenever I went to her home. I want my M T Veeee...good times.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Tue Feb 13, 12:14:00 am GMT-5  

  • By the Numbers
    Located a few miles south of Detroit at the confluence of the Rouge and Detroit Rivers


    Ohhh. Well. That makes sense I guess.

    But Rouge Factory, itself, well that sounds a bit fey.

    I get an immediate visual of burly blue-collar workers stuffing ladies' makeup into tiny compacts, assembly line style.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Tue Feb 13, 12:18:00 am GMT-5  

  • Hi Victoria-

    Hey Sippi. :)

    I hope you have checked out my Sidebar for updated blogroll links. ;)

    I copied a shaker work table from Henry Ford's museum. I call it a Ma Barker's kitchen table.

    Ma Barker! How come they don't have semi-outlaw heroines like that in America, anymore?

    You know, like Bonnie and Clyde, and Jesse James and them.

    It can't all just be down to the FBI cracking down hard, by the 30s?

    I think journalists then used to like to memorialise, and romanticise fugitives and crooks, by investing them with an aura quite beyond their very real brutality.

    Anyway, didn't mean to barge in on your Furniture reveries with mine. ;)

    I made up the part about Ma Barker. It's just called a shaker work table at the museum.

    Hey, why were Shakers into furniture-making? As opposed to other Anabaptist sects, I mean.

    And some of the most elegant furniture I've ever seen, has been Shaker furniture. I wish those in Europe, knew it more.

    I've never been there. I go a picture of the thing from a very old out of print book.

    Heh.

    BTW, Sippican, your link above doesn't work. I even shortened it to just plain "sippicancottagecfurniture.com", nada.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Tue Feb 13, 12:24:00 am GMT-5  

  • Look at this Shaker table.

    EXQUISITE.

    BTW, I heard that Babs Streisand sold her Art Nouveau collection, including furniture, because she said it made her "neurotic" (so that was the reason!).

    Her current obsession is collecting Shaker furniture.

    Well, at least the woman has taste, I'll give her that.

    Madonna outfits her home at IKEA, FFS.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Tue Feb 13, 12:29:00 am GMT-5  

  • Also, don't forget FIAT:

    Futile Italian Attempt at Transportation.

    or Fix It Again, Tony!


    Heh.

    At Babalublog, someone recently reminded me that "If it doesn't leak, it's not British".

    The Henry Ford Museum also has the chair from Ford's Theatre that Lincoln was shot in by John Wilkes Booth. Is there blood? Oh, yeah.

    You mean, the original is not at Fords Theatre, in DC? Aw man, I've been there.

    I forget where Kennedy's car in which he was shot in Dallas is, but I wouldn't be surprised to hear it's either in the Rouge Factory, or at the Smithsonian.

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Tue Feb 13, 12:37:00 am GMT-5  

  • Clyde Barrow allegedly wrote Henry Ford a fan letter endorsing Ford V-8's as the car to steal for use in a getaway:

    Dear Sir:

    While I still have breath in my lungs I will tell you what a dandy car you make. I have drove exclusively when I could get away with one. For sustained speed and freedom from trouble the Ford has got ever other car skinned and even if my business hasen't been strictly legal it don't hurt anything to tell you what a fine car you got in the Ford V-8.

    Yours truly,
    Clyde Champion Barrow


    The original is on display at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI, although some doubt it's authenticity, Ford Motor did and does not.

    By Blogger Internet Ronin, at Tue Feb 13, 12:43:00 am GMT-5  

  • Henry Ford

    1.) hated the idea of wasting cut grass around the Ford headquarters. So...he'd make grass sandwiches for employees. "Here...have a grass sandwich."

    2.) came back from a world tour in 1919(?) proclaiming his desire to make a tractor "simple enough for a Polish Jew to drive."

    3.) Installed the first lawn sprinkler system by his house in 1913.

    4.) Obsessed about soybeans, and they were grown in large quantities near Ford Headquarters into the '70's I think.

    5.) Used to play tricks on Harvey Firestone by carving wood croutons for his soup when they went camping...

    6.) Died in 1947 in a house without electricity, which was lost in a storm...

    This house was on the college campus I went to, and I used to go and eat lunch at a restaurant there that was converted from the old swimming pool...

    By Blogger Ron, at Tue Feb 13, 01:15:00 am GMT-5  

  • Hi Victoria- I update my blogroll every 18 months or so, whether it needs it or not. Anything is possible. I am relentless in this regard.

    That link works for me. But then again, what good is that? I already know what that table looks like. When you wrote it out, BTW, you stuck an extra "c" in the middle of it. You can get to it through a link my blog, if anybody's interested.

    Shakers believed that the embellishment of anything with ornament was profane. So they made stripped down furniture that relied on fine proportions, absolute utility, fine woodgrain, and bright colors. People don't really know about the bright color part much, because they've faded. They were screaming lipstick red and chrome yellow and so forth when they were new.

    The Shakers were more like a vertically integrated manufacturing corporation than a religion. They discovered that outsiders --they called everybody else "the world" would buy their things, so they began to manufacture them on a fairly large scale.

    In general, people like Babs are drawn to the furniture because it's awesome, but they dig the communist nutcase millenarianism of the Shakers too.

    Technically, the majority of my furniture isn't really Shaker. It's something called Country Hepplewhite. It's all as interesting as hell. Almost as interesting as the people in your blogroll.

    By Blogger SippicanCottage, at Tue Feb 13, 09:06:00 am GMT-5  

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