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Sundries
...a sweatshop of moxie

Saturday, December 20, 2008

Turkish Murkish



I actually had a cup of authentic Turkish coffee in a Sephardic Kosher deli the other day -- delicious. Look at the sludge formed by the grounds as they rest at the bottom of the snowy white cup.

It's actually a metaphor for life in such environs. On the surface, dazzling and exotic, quick to intrigue, quicker to charm, but at the bottom, it's all sediment and gunk.

It takes a strong person to be able to like such coffee. And I am that person.

UPDATED: Using a paint programme, I inverted the colours and used an artistic rendering to soften the photograph.

It's Crumby!

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6 Comments:

  • I love Sundries on Sundays, it smells like, coffee!

    Remember when you told me Some love it, but many think they break down too easily.? You were so right. I'll spare you the details.

    I confess I've never had such turkish brew. :(
    But I do love espresso so rich that you can taste the oils floating on top. I recall when and where I got hooked-the Milano train station. I was 19 and traveling alone. It was my time ever in Italy (Europe too) and I'd just taken an overnight train from Luxembourg. That was after a flight from Chicago and a refueling stop in Reykjavik.
    As you exit the tracks in Milano, there's a little coffee bar tucked back on the left, the kind with the big polished machines and those decadent bowls of white sugar with long skinny serving spoons. I had heard of "Italian Coffee" in Wisconsin, but never really knew what I was missing until that moment.
    When I returned to Madison, I was the weirdo with the taste for espresso and cappuccino. Mind you this was years (1979) before Starbucks. Sure espresso was available in those days, but not on a student budget.

    but at the bottom, it's all sediment and gunk.

    Eat that sediment- it's rich in fiber.

    Using a paint programme, I inverted..

    Given that you used a program, your crumby talents seem sketchy, but I still like the result! :)

    By Blogger chickenlittle, at Sun Dec 21, 12:43:00 pm GMT-5  

  • You need an ibrick (sp?) to get the good Turkish coffee...and several cookings!

    By Blogger Ron, at Sun Dec 21, 03:20:00 pm GMT-5  

  • I love Sundries on Sundays, it smells like, coffee!

    Yay, Chickenlittle. I am glad you took notice. ;)

    Remember when you told me Some love it, but many think they break down too easily.? You were so right. I'll spare you the details.

    Oh, what a shame. Good memory -- I would never have been able to hunt down the thread (though I recall telling you so).

    I confess I've never had such turkish brew. :(

    Well, it's not for everyone. I realise you say below you like it thick (me too!) but this doesn't impart the rich oily substance a good espresso does. It's sandy, rough, like the beaches of Salonika.

    But I do love espresso so rich that you can taste the oils floating on top. I recall when and where I got hooked-the Milano train station. I was 19 and traveling alone. It was my time ever in Italy (Europe too) and I'd just taken an overnight train from Luxembourg. That was after a flight from Chicago and a refueling stop in Reykjavik.

    OMG! My parents used to take that econo route too -- Iceland Airways!

    Not from Chicago, you understand. From the Bahamas. That stopped in the mid-80s, when they got a little more money, but I rather liked it. :)

    As you exit the tracks in Milano, there's a little coffee bar tucked back on the left, the kind with the big polished machines and those decadent bowls of white sugar with long skinny serving spoons. I had heard of "Italian Coffee" in Wisconsin, but never really knew what I was missing until that moment.
    When I returned to Madison, I was the weirdo with the taste for espresso and cappuccino. Mind you this was years (1979) before Starbucks. Sure espresso was available in those days, but not on a student budget.


    I love it. Also, this is why I love Starbucks. Their coffee is actually awful as everone knows, but how do most Americans know it? Because of Starbucks -- that motivated people to become more interested to be coffee connoisseurs.

    Whenever I go to England, my cousins stare at me incomprehensibly when I speak about Saecos, Gaggias, Rancilio, etc.

    But chances are an American flying next to me wouldn't be so clueless. :)

    Eat that sediment- it's rich in fiber.

    I have my limits. Also, I am not a flower. More like a pesky weed.

    Given that you used a program, your crumby talents seem sketchy, but I still like the result! :)

    *groan*

    Ruth Anne has punning competition, Chickenlittle!

    I am off to watch "Doubt" with Streep and Hoffmann. HOPEFULLY THEN I will write up that Movie Review. Hang in there, guys! ;)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sun Dec 21, 03:22:00 pm GMT-5  

  • You need an ibrick (sp?) to get the good Turkish coffee...and several cookings!

    Hey, Ron. :)

    I blogged about this once. Even showed you guys the one I got in a Ft. Lauderdale Lebanese grocer.

    I will hunt for the thread lates, as I am out the door!

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sun Dec 21, 03:23:00 pm GMT-5  

  • It's called Icelandair now, Chicken, no longer Icelandic Airways.

    Early sixth freedom flights operated to Findel airport in Luxembourg. That airport was eventually dropped in 1999 in favor of service to more populous cities in Europe. In 1996, Icelandair entered into an interline and marketing agreement with low-fare carrier, Southwest Airlines.[2] This allowed Southwest to carry American passengers destined for Europe. The agreements are no longer in effect.

    I actually talk about our Luxembourg jaunt in one of the best posts I've ever written (modest, ain't she) Reims.

    What is it about that airlines that seems to spark atmospheric memories thereafter?

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Sun Dec 21, 03:29:00 pm GMT-5  

  • It's called Icelandair now, Chicken, no longer Icelandic Airways.
    As you say, at the time it was the econo way to get to Europe. I can almost still see the smallish advertisment in The Daily Cardinal (a student newspaper): Chicago-Luxemborg- $429. Icelandic Airways (or whatever it was called then).

    I actually talk about our Luxembourg jaunt in one of the best posts I've ever written (modest, ain't she) Reims.

    Beautiful. You know, if I had half your talent and gumption, I could write a pretty good reflection of my trip from Paris to Luxembourg. I did the reverse trip --Paris to Luxembourg--at the end of my 3 month stay in Italy (I went under and around the Alps, and stayed a few days in Paris before flying back home from Luxembourg). And I would fill that recollection with a whole summer full of first impressions.

    We must have seen the same rolling French landscape, but from a different perspective. I do recall the Reims Cathedral (seen like you through a window). But what I remember the most (and maybe it's a guy thing) are the haunted place names along that route: names like Verdun-sur-Meuse.
    The First World War had both fascinated and horrified me as a boy. Years later (not that trip), when my wife and I visited London together for the first time, we split up the first day with different agenda. She went to some or other museum while went straight away the Imperial War Museum, alone. Why? I still don't know why.

    What is it about that airlines that seems to spark atmospheric memories thereafter?

    I guess it's the caliber of people who flew on it.

    By Blogger chickenlittle, at Sun Dec 21, 07:07:00 pm GMT-5  

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