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Sundries
...a sweatshop of moxie

Sunday, February 26, 2006

Kola Inglesa

Like all well-bred people, the family gave us some lovely presents, from their equally lovely homeland.

My mother got an alpaca shawl. My dad a vicuna overcoat. I got a beautiful rosary-set, blessed by the Cardinal of Lima.

And, then, we all got this:



Kola Inglesa! English Coke? A red cola -- cool!

Now, many people don't realise that Coke and Pepsi are not the only soda-pop around the world.

Sure, lots of people know about Canada-Dry, maybe some know Britvic Orange, and the like...

...but do you know almost every country has its very own local soft drink?

Peru has Inca Kola, which is a funny name to English ears, I grant you.

This pop has a funny, rather coincidental history, since it was a family of British expats called Lindley, who settled in Lima in the late 19th century, and who were the inventors, and packagers of this monumentally popular soft drink.

It's been described as looking like wee-wee, and tasting like bubble-gum, which is so not true.

Well, the bubble gum bit, anyway.



But, now with this never-before-tasted Kola Inglesa, I have a quandry.

One which I will leave up to Sundries readers, to decide.

Should I, during Sunday dinner, open the six-pack of these glass bottles of the red cola, and serve them alongside the Argentinian wine, Manchego cheese, and Pralines Bread Pudding other readers suggested I serve...

...or do I open only one...

...or not even one, just keeping them with their caps on, as a souvenir?


Your call.

UPDATE: I took commenter Pete's advice, and served them to my guests, fully expecting them to ask for the English Kola at table. For whatever reason, out of politeness, lack of interest, or just forgetfulness, we ignored the Kolas, and thus, I still have a whole six-pack at my disposal.

Now taking eBay bids! Starting price: $999 (reserve).

9 Comments:

  • If I were a visitor to Peru and I had brought my hostess a six-pack of Coke, I would be underwhelmed to have it served back to me for dinner. Especially when my hostess had made a game attempt to serve me a spread of Peruvian-ized American dishes and American wine. How awful to consider a taste of my native Coke to be the highlight of dinner!

    However, I might find myself delighted to see my charming hostess with the odd accent and cute freckles pop open a bottle of Coke for herself, imbibe, pronounce it the best ever with perhaps a wink and a thumbs up, and offer a serving to everyone present. I'm sure my wonderful hostess would be quietly confident that everyone else would be far too polite to take her up on her offer and she would be able to enjoy the rest of my gift at her leisure. Or pour it down the drain when no one was looking.

    But that's just me.

    By Blogger Pete, at Sun Feb 26, 07:34:00 am GMT-5  

  • This is America, keep them all and sell them on eBay, only first, etch what could look like the Madonna on each of them. Brings a much better price.

    By Blogger Paul, at Sun Feb 26, 02:18:00 pm GMT-5  

  • pete's right, paul's gauche!

    Pour yourself a glass, over cubes, and sip away! Then let us know how it tastes.

    But don't serve it to your guests.

    One bottle ought to be enough. Save the rest! LOL

    By Blogger benning, at Sun Feb 26, 09:49:00 pm GMT-5  

  • If I were a visitor to Peru and I had brought my hostess a six-pack of Coke, I would be underwhelmed to have it served back to me for dinner.

    Hmm.

    Two things struck me upon reading this.

    First, the whole point of them bringing us "Kola Inglesa" as a present, was because we're English, and they thought it would amuse us to see this "Coke" with this particular name.

    Second, who brings Coke as a present, without rhyme nor reason?!?! ;)

    Especially when my hostess had made a game attempt to serve me a spread of Peruvian-ized American dishes and American wine.

    Hmmmmmmmmm.

    How awful to consider a taste of my native Coke to be the highlight of dinner!

    Well, no no, I didn't mean to imply that's ALL I would be serving.

    We had copious amounts of beverages to hand.

    Everything from Vouvray wine, to Argentinian wine, to Perrier for the kids.

    However, I might find myself delighted to see my charming hostess with the odd accent and cute freckles pop open a bottle of Coke for herself, imbibe, pronounce it the best ever with perhaps a wink and a thumbs up, and offer a serving to everyone present. I'm sure my wonderful hostess would be quietly confident that everyone else would be far too polite to take her up on her offer and she would be able to enjoy the rest of my gift at her leisure. Or pour it down the drain when no one was looking.

    Heh.

    But that's just me.

    Keep reading for my decision.

    But thanks for the reply, and help, Pete! :)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Mon Feb 27, 01:52:00 am GMT-5  

  • This is America, keep them all and sell them on eBay, only first, etch what could look like the Madonna on each of them. Brings a much better price.

    OMG! Mum, is that you?

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Mon Feb 27, 01:52:00 am GMT-5  

  • pete's right, paul's gauche!

    I think Paul would be very offended to be called a lefty. ;)

    Pour yourself a glass, over cubes, and sip away! Then let us know how it tastes.

    WELL! I decided to go with Peter's decision -- to offer it to my guests, and then imbibe one English Cola myself.

    But just like my plans for the beach and the movies, it didn't exactly come out right.

    I put the Kolas in the ice-buckets, alongside the other drinks, but no one asked for it -- even me!

    I don't think they noticed, and hey, I still have my six-pack. :)

    But don't serve it to your guests.

    One bottle ought to be enough. Save the rest! LOL


    Meanie!

    Thanks for the help, Benning. :)

    Cheers,
    Victoria

    By Blogger vbspurs, at Mon Feb 27, 01:55:00 am GMT-5  

  • I think Paul would be very offended to be called a lefty. ;)


    gauche [gōsh]
    adjective
    socially awkward: lacking grace or tact in social situations

    [Mid-18th century. < French , "left-handed"]


    Nope, he's right (pun) on, I am and have always been left-handed, enduring the social elitism and outright discrimination of those less artistically inclined "rightys"; no offense intended.
    As for the adjective, perhaps. For instance, notice that I had to look the word up.

    By Blogger Paul, at Mon Feb 27, 08:47:00 am GMT-5  

  • OMG! Mum, is that you?

    I doubt I've been more highly complimented in my life.

    By Blogger Paul, at Mon Feb 27, 08:52:00 am GMT-5  

  • Thanks for taking my advice, Victoria.

    Now, can I advise you on purchasing some shares in an offshore tax-shelter that's just perfect for you?

    Kidding!

    By Blogger Pete, at Tue Feb 28, 07:23:00 am GMT-5  

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